myBurbank Talks

Burbank Business Sportlight: Supreme Pawfection

November 09, 2023 Craig Sherwood, Ross Benson, Mark Flores Season 1 Episode 2
myBurbank Talks
Burbank Business Sportlight: Supreme Pawfection
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Get ready for a tail-wagging episode as Burbank Talks presents the Burbank Business Showcase as we welcome Mark Flores, the passionate animal lover and professional pet groomer behind Supreme Perfection Mobile Pet Grooming Service. Mark's infectious love for animals and his journey from an animal enthusiast to a professional groomer makes for a fascinating tale, filled with anecdotes about various breeds and shared family passion. We also debunk some common misconceptions about pit bulls and celebrate the shared love for animals within Mark's family, especially on his brother's birthday.

Join us for an exciting ride into Mark's state-of-the-art grooming van, offering a luxury mobile pet grooming experience like no other. We touch upon the importance of trust in his business and how he recruits the best groomers to ensure only the supreme quality. Mark shares insightful advice on reading a pet's cues during grooming, anecdotes about his family dog, Dodger, and the unique bond with his clientele, formed through a shared love for animals and trust.

Wrapping up our delightful chat with Mark, he astounds us with insights on dog intelligence and his personal experiences with his son's golden doodle. Shifting focus to the advantages of mobile grooming services, Mark details the extraordinary measures taken by his company to ensure the safety and comfort of pets. Whether you're a pet lover, owner, or just an intrigued listener, buckle up for a heartwarming episode filled with Mark's wisdom and a bonus bark from Dodger!

Speaker 1:

from deep in the Burbank Media District. It's time for another edition of my Burbank Talks, presented by the staff of my Burbank. Now let's see what's on today's agenda as we join our program.

Speaker 2:

Hello everybody. Craig Shrewett here, along with, of course, ross Benson.

Speaker 3:

I gotta say my lights not on the. That's probably because I hit the wrong button. I don't always work the cameras. So, gotcha, howdy, we got a great, great show lined up for you.

Speaker 2:

Well, we're doing an addition of Burbank Business Showcase tonight and we have with us Mark Flores, who is the owner of Supreme Perfection. Now, if you don't know what that is, I we're gonna talk all about it. Mark's company, supreme Perfection, has actually been grooming my dog. It's a mobile grooming service, mobile pet grooming service and he's been rooming my dog, dodger, who I guess you hear on our occasional podcast. Here and there we can the ball or something. But he's been grooming for for a couple years now and I've been so impressed with his operation and his business and his people. I just said you know what you'd be a great, a great business showcase for us. So you brought you on, so we'd like to introduce you to Mark Flores.

Speaker 4:

Hey, everybody, how's it going? Thank you for having me.

Speaker 3:

Welcome aboard. You know you're gonna get an award when you're done doing this podcast. He has a gift for you Awesome.

Speaker 2:

We have parting gifts absolutely.

Speaker 4:

Great, great. You gotta get through the show, not a wash or dryer thing, but you're gonna enjoy it, we hope.

Speaker 2:

Okay. So, mark, you know I was reading through your bio and I saw that you always had a profound love of animals. So what do you think spurred that when you were a young kid and you know, and what kind of pets did you have growing up?

Speaker 4:

So growing up I had three pit bulls and then I've also had two shitsus, I believe at the time.

Speaker 3:

I beg your pardon.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, pit bulls and two shitsus. So I grew up around dogs my whole life.

Speaker 3:

Wait, wait, wait, I got a quick question.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah, of course.

Speaker 3:

How much grooming does a pit bull take?

Speaker 1:

Honestly, that bear is yeah.

Speaker 3:

There's a pit bull in the other room. Yeah, we have a fur, it's what?

Speaker 2:

Literally it can take up to like 30 minutes, literally cuz what are my roommates has a pit bull and Lola and one of the friendliest dogs, and you know I was kind of terrified when he first got a pit bull. You know she was a little puppy and he's the whole time. But I think pit bulls sometimes get a bad rap, don't you?

Speaker 4:

Yes, agreed, they do get a bad rep just because of like, pit bulls are dangerous. Pit bulls are trained to kill, you know. But honestly, it really depends on who the owner is that trains them, shows them love. Like any other dog, pit bulls are the sweetest. Every pit bull I've had encountered nothing but love. You know, come up to you, we'll give you kisses.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, what's funny that Lola here never, never gives kisses.

Speaker 4:

No.

Speaker 2:

Oh, she's not give kisses now that Dodger. That's all he does once the Dodgers like that yeah he's a liquor. He loves that salt From day one yeah, so do you have any pets right now?

Speaker 4:

Currently no, my brother does. He has two Belgian.

Speaker 3:

Wait a minute, your brother. I somebody sent me a telegram is today your brother's birthday.

Speaker 4:

Yes, it is Shout out to Christian there you go Christian.

Speaker 3:

Yep today's Christian you're due yeah exactly, he's also a groomer.

Speaker 4:

so oh, really oh family trade, does he?

Speaker 3:

work with you.

Speaker 4:

Not with me now. No, he works at another company right now.

Speaker 2:

Okay, well, not for long.

Speaker 4:

Not for long.

Speaker 3:

That's what we'll say Success you're having you'll get his own van Exactly.

Speaker 2:

So tell us about your journey. I mean, now you own your own business, but how did you get here? How did you, you know, become your own groomer? What was your journey in the, in the world of pets and grooming, all that?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, interesting. Obviously, after high school, that was the hardest thing to decide on, to what to do with my life. You know, that was the question I was always getting you go to college, you go to work. You know, if you do go to work, where do you want to work? You know what do you love? I grew up playing, like I said, sports, so I only knew about basketball and basketball was like my life, like just going to the NBA. You know, that's all I wanted to do and I feel like that was my dream.

Speaker 3:

Sure, and it should be Wait, wait, wait, wait. Most people can't tell from where he's sitting in high school.

Speaker 4:

You said you were four entering high school house four, six, so.

Speaker 3:

I was. You were thinking of pro basketball. You would be looking way up there.

Speaker 2:

I was mumbling bugs.

Speaker 4:

He was like five, four, five, five, yeah, yeah, so it can't happen.

Speaker 2:

You know, and I think you know, I used to be a high school coach and I think at that level, especially high school, if I had a player who didn't want to go to the next level, I didn't really have enough respect for him, because I think your goal has to always be to move up a level. You know, I think you should always play a sport until you're told you can't play a sport anymore, because if you quit before you're told that, you'll always have the back of your mind hey, could I have made it? Could I have done it? You know, you'll never know, so you go as high as you can. So I think that was a good ambition, yeah. But then you got told yeah, exactly and honestly.

Speaker 4:

After, like I said, after high school, I did continue my journey with school, going to GCC, okay, and, you know, registering for the GCC team you know, trying to help them out and, you know, just develop my own game there, you know. But obviously life happened right and that's where my career with Petsmart started. So I started with them at age 19 around 20 years old.

Speaker 2:

What brought you to this? You were just walking the door and happened to see a sign saying they need somebody. Or or do you look around and say, you know, I kind of want to work with animals, or what was the?

Speaker 4:

actually that happened because of my sister, my sister's friend, who was in my French class or speech class, I can't remember, but it was one of those classes. You, know little French huh yeah, yeah, a little bit. I'm not that good, yeah, but he basically was a manager at the Petsmart where I started my journey with grooming dogs. You know, they needed someone who were just like, wanting to learn and grow with the company, and so they gave me a shot, they gave me an interview. I didn't know much about animals at that time. I just came in as, like, you guys need me to clean the restrooms, I'll do that. You know, I just wanted a job and that was the thing I didn't like animals yeah, obviously I had the love for animals, but my, my whole thing was just like get a job, get paid, make some money, because rent is coming up, you need to pay bills, you need to pay for gas, you know to get around. So that was like my main concern after going down that road. So once I got into Petsmart, I was located into doggy daycare first and that was just basically you just take care of dogs like head owners will drop off their dogs and you're just in a room full of like 15 to 20 dogs and you just make sure that they don't bite each other yeah, they don't eat one of each other's poops, because that does happen and you know, you just try to give them water between and just try to play with them. But interaction was just like make sure no one gets hurt. That's that was my job. So I was like, hey, that's what you guys need me to do. I'll do that, you know.

Speaker 2:

I bet you saw that one dog that would come in.

Speaker 4:

They would just say, oh boy, not that one again yes, yes, like people yeah, yeah, I get that yeah, we had one that, like I said, would would try to beat you to another dogs to eat their poop, like you would try to sprint to the other dogs and try to beat you to no dog etiquette there is there for you.

Speaker 2:

I teach a medic, and they just don't.

Speaker 4:

So after a couple months of being there, my manager at the time, debbie, she I told her like hey, like you guys need me on the cell floor, like I'm willing to go out, you know, do whatever you guys need me to do, you know, because I felt contained. You know which it was. It was in a big room and it was just me and another co-worker. We'll talk, but it's like I needed more. You know, I'm like a husser, so I was like, especially playing sports. You're just like I want to move, I want to do this, I want to do that, you know. So I got to a point where she was like, okay, like yeah, we need someone to like help with bags to clients car, then you know, we'll call you up. You know, if we need you know in order to be placed, we'll call you up once again. And you know that happened for a couple weeks. And then, after a while, there's a position that opened up in their grooming facility and they're like hey, do you want to become a bather? I was like a bather and like what's that? What's that all about? You know, what do you do? Or just like literally what the title is like you're just giving out a little bath, yeah literally you're just gonna wash dogs all day. You know, we'll break it down to you, we'll have someone train you and you know, from there it's that's what it is, and just repetition. I was like, okay, yeah, it sounds fun. I mean, when do I start? They're like that girl, just you know you just did yeah yeah, that girl just quit, so we have a position right now. Do you want to go? I was like, yeah, yeah, let's do it, you know? And from there my career took off, that's all so what made you say you know what?

Speaker 2:

I'm gonna leave the nice Weekly paycheck that somebody hands me every week and I'm gonna do this on my own. Now, what, what, what was that decision all about? How was that? How tough was that?

Speaker 4:

It was during the COVID time. So was it tough? Yes, it was a tough decision to make. I think it just got to a point where I've been doing this for ten years and I was just like you know what I can, I can do something with this. You know, let me let me, you know, let me try something on my own. Let's see how far we can take this. But at the same time, if anything happens where you know, quote-unquote if I fail, at least I can say I tried and I can go with that and and see if, like, what's gonna happen, you know, let's, let's risk it all, let's see what we can do. And then from there, just basically.

Speaker 2:

But what? Why mobile? What? Where'd you come up with mobile, instead of just saying okay, I'll my own little shop somewhere, let me throw in there.

Speaker 3:

I, I've used your service. Yeah, duchess, my dog Labrador has Enjoyed your van, your, your van, yeah, is not just your standard Chevy Eco van, your van is tricked out and that's the next you chose, I believe, like Craig says, at 40 hour, you know a week and your vans, and they're specialized.

Speaker 2:

It's amazing. It's a self-contained and has an air conditioning inside, so on a hot day they sell a good temperature, or on water. Everything is in that thing. So so, yeah, tell us about. Did you design the van, did you? How did you get the van? How'd you come with the van? I usually have a couple now, don't you?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah. So before I went on my own, I used to work for another mobile grooming company that I helped kind of start up on their own. And you know, like I said, throughout my years of learning my experience, I was just like you know what, let me try this out. I can do this. I have a good clientele who would come to my home base and kind of get groomed within my garage, you know, and kind of start from there. So I was just like you know what the vans themselves are Mercedes Benz vans that are then transported from Mercedes to a company called Hanvy. There's two companies there's Hanvy and there's wagon tails. So with Hanvy they have their own setup. How, how have you guys seen it already? Which basically the tub and the table are right next to each other. Hanvy, I believe I mean Mercedes Benz Wagon tails has the van towards the back and then they have the table in the middle.

Speaker 2:

That turns Do you have any input on how they put things in or anything, or is it kind of? We have this design already and this is how you can buy it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, basically that's how it is. It's like they have their specific design. They have certain upgrades or options that you can apply for, but basically if Hanvy designs the vans a certain way, then that's how you're gonna get it. If you go with wagon tails and they have the van design a certain way, you know, and one thing that I've realized with both vans is that I like their designs. There's certain things that I like with Hanvy and there's certain designs I like with wagon tails.

Speaker 3:

They're both great companies, but yeah, well, one of the things I will say that I saw yesterday. Your vans are immaculate, I you know. You drive down the freeway or you drive across Burbank, mm-hmm, and you see these mobile groomers that their vans look. They're one on their last leg and two like they haven't been washed in six months. You know, and I will say, when you guys pulled up, that van was clean your. What was the young lady's name at? Leasey Leasey. Yeah, she knows, she was wearing her shirt. She was, you know, real presentable and one she I could tell she loved the dog. Yeah, you know, dutchess. You know, jumped on her once and that was it, but then afterwards, duchess Tim Bark anymore, and that that's a lot to a client, mm-hmm, you know.

Speaker 2:

So I how they do exactly, and that's that's so important, you know, and every time dodge, dodge or just you see, actually see the man you know run, kind of decide, and he'll roll in the ground upside down and you guys always come and release on them and Get them going and you know it's just well.

Speaker 3:

That was my other worry. As I said prior to the show, duchess hasn't been, you know, socialized real well and I'm always in fear that she'd take our front and she won't hear that command stop, stay, or whatever. But I had her on a leash and Lacey. Lacey said Let me close the door. Once that doors closed, you know she's inside and I felt totally I wasn't worried the whole time. I think I looked out once to make sure the fan was still, but I'll tell you, you know, and once the door closed, she was, you know, at work and I. That's a fear of a pet owner, yeah, you know. And so I felt very, very trusted with her. You know I got recommended by Craig. But I also looked at your website, your website's great Something, and you know I read a lot about it and again.

Speaker 2:

We'll put a link to his website in our description too, so you guys can get to it like I said earlier, I have a you know a kid and your pet.

Speaker 3:

No offense, I think I treat my pet better than my kids sometimes, but that's how you know and that's why I wouldn't you know I was really you know Matt listens to this.

Speaker 2:

That's his son.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, but I took care of my granddaughter today, so it's okay.

Speaker 2:

So what, what? What's this? What are the? What are some things inside your van? What are the things you can do? What kind of grooming things can you do in the van?

Speaker 4:

grooming, we pretty much can do everything and anything. It's funny cuz a Lot of people will ask us like do you guys groom every dog and eat any size? And we're like, yeah, every size. Literally we can fit them all in our tubs and on our tables. How big is Duchess?

Speaker 3:

She said about 75 pounds.

Speaker 2:

Okay, yeah, rogers at 80.

Speaker 3:

so and she said she has a friend that has a lab that's over 100 and it's hard to put the back end up, Mm-hmm.

Speaker 4:

But I guess is your tables go up and down, oh yeah, so that's the little high dog thing that I love about that table that it actually goes down to your ankle Basically, so the dog can just literally step up and it's like a baby step up. It's not not like, oh, you have to get up a lot, it's literally a baby step up and that helps. Just have a dog on the table and lift them up and then also to get them in the tub our on pole, you just use a wrench and then you can Take off the the pole from from where it's standing and then you just walk the dog into the tub. Oh, we have a walk-in path for the dog, so it helps the groomer not break their back.

Speaker 2:

And less trauma for the dog too, because he's not being manipulated.

Speaker 4:

Exactly.

Speaker 3:

So I'm curious, in that wash tub, mm-hmm, is it hot water, cold water? How many gallons do you carry?

Speaker 4:

on board. So we carry 60 gallons, 35 gallons of dirty water and, yeah, it's lukewarm water. So we have a temperature controller in the back that you can basically make it boiling hot if you want, or super cold, but we have it right in between. Where see people? Have people?

Speaker 3:

you know, like I said, I was blown away yesterday. You know, I used to take the dog to a groomer. But this comes to your house, parked in front of my house, the dog's getting a bath in warm water. The dog came out, dutchess came out smelling better, a lot better than she went in, but now I smell you that's-. I mean all the things that she did. You know the ears. She brushed her teeth, she cleaned, not only clipped her toenails, but she filed her toenails. All these things. And it was at the convenience of my house.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so the biggest thing that I've always told people about mobile grooming it's a luxury experience, you know. If you care about your time and your day, especially when you're supposed to maneuver things around, you're basically I don't want to say paying for that service, but paying for the time you know, like getting things done.

Speaker 2:

I think people don't realize that their time is valuable Any time I see, you know, I'll drive down the street and I love portals, which is great, it's a great place, but I'll walk out and see a line that's probably 35, 40 minutes long. I'll go. How do you stand in line that long to get some food? Or Tommy's a good example, they have their when they go on their anniversary. They'll have like 50, 50 cents, 55 cents. These burgers and people will stand in line all the way down the street and I'll go. Okay, so you saved $3. How much was your time worth to save that $3?

Speaker 3:

But I will say, like my son who has two kids, my daughter-in-law is running left and right, yeah, and when you're taking kids here and there and you think about it, you know the convenience of having the groomer come to your house. You don't have to worry about it.

Speaker 2:

Think of this you go to a groomer and there are great groomers out there, but you've got to get your dog, you've got to get him in the car, you've got to get over there, you've got to check in, you've got to get back home. There's 30 minutes, and then there are 30 minutes to go pick him up. There's one hour. And then the thing that because I'm thinking of the dog's point of view well, it probably takes maybe an hour to groom him, but you leave him there 10 in the morning and pick him up at 6 in the afternoon. So that means my dog is sitting in a cage for five hours by himself. So I look at the dog's point of view too, and to me that's why this is a no-brainer for me. This is why it's so much more convenient, because I know he's next in line and when he's done he's back in.

Speaker 4:

That's exactly what it is. It's that profound of care that you have with mobile that you won't have in a salon. I love salons and, like how you said, there's amazing groomers out there, absolutely. But they get slammed with dogs walking in, putting dogs away and me. Working in two corporate companies who gave me different outlooks, I've saw the same exact outcome. Which someone would come drop off their dog, their dogs literally could be done in an hour, an hour and a half, maybe two. That dog is sitting there for two to three hours more than needed to, versus being like, hey, your dog's ready, come and get your dog. They're like, well, I'm out with my kids, or hey, I'm at lunch right now, so I can't, you know, and so that dog's just okay, I'm just sitting here bored, I don't know what to do, and then they'll use the restroom. And then we got to rewash them and so that was a problem, you know. But, like I said, coming mobile and providing the service either at your household, in front of your doorstep, or at your job, we've gotten both. So the luxury of that is amazing. And, like I said, bringing the dog into the van versus putting the household, putting the dog into your car and then taking them out. Spending time to drive in traffic versus once you're done Absolutely. Hey, you're home, you're home.

Speaker 3:

So I know I interrupted when we were talking about your van. Craig was asking and talking about the wash and I threw that in there about warm water. Your van, like I said, is tricked out. I mean you had everything besides the hot water. The table that goes up and down, the dog is secured, like at every other groomer. Usually, you know the head, they put a collar on or whatever and drying it dogs freak out with air dryers, you know, and stuff like that. But what's nice is you're enclosed in such a you know, and these vans are tall, they're not tall. Yeah, standard van, I said they're air conditioned nicely and everything.

Speaker 2:

The last time they were here, six weeks ago I think it was, there was like 110 outside and I was kind of worried like, oh, it's good, oh no, we're kind of fine, you know, we'll be fine in here. And I go wow, that's really good to know. I felt bad for the groomer too. Oh yes, I don't. The groomer is going to be as comfortable as the dog now.

Speaker 3:

Well, and I know the van I was. She had her. She had to bring her dog with her yesterday, but they're closed off because I was worried that Duchess, might you know around other dog, a new dog, she said she'll never get. You know they're up there.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I didn't know that I wonder how Dodger was with the, because Dodger loves to just market dogs all the time.

Speaker 3:

So you're in front of a. It's closed off.

Speaker 4:

So yeah. So in front of the van, the cargo side, where the driver's at with the passenger, there's a door that splits you can actually walk through instead of getting out the van and going around you can actually yeah, so you can go through, and that's what separates. And in there too, you just put up the windows, turn on the AC.

Speaker 2:

Because Dodger needs to socialize more. Yeah, I'm talking to you, Dodger. He's right next to us here.

Speaker 4:

No, we love Dodger. He's great. But yeah our van includes everything. Our van is great. Like we said, we have an AC inside, we have a heater, went for the cold weather, of course. We have a table that goes all the way up and down, and then we have a cabinet that holds all our tools. So anything that you need, it's all equipped in that van. It's a state of the art van.

Speaker 3:

And she asked me every. You know is Duchess allergic to soaps. Does she have any? You know spots on her that she needs to worry about All those questions that a groomer wants to know. In the back of her head you can tell that she wasn't just a hired person and I think that kind of leads into our next question about your groomers.

Speaker 2:

Well, I'll just say one more thing first that we kind of which I didn't realize until we kind of talked about briefly, for the show was about dogs and fleas and everything else. And you said that you do immaculate cleaning of your van every single day. Make sure there's nothing lingering, you know, because dogs have fleas, gets it. News alert people.

Speaker 4:

Yes, dogs have fleas.

Speaker 3:

So well, I was just told and she told me Lisa, it's common at a groomers where you have 10 dogs brought in, they bring in fleas and if you're not, you know, at the end of the day spraying your place down in a van.

Speaker 2:

It gets clean daily so you don't have to worry about that Is that dog singing a cage before it gets groomed with other dogs that those fleas start jumping. Yeah, you know, those fleas have. They love any dog they can find.

Speaker 3:

You don't have a flea sound. Oh no, oh yeah.

Speaker 4:

We also. Yeah. So for fleas, we definitely like, once we find out or when we know, we kind of take the dog straight into the bathtub and start the process there. So we don't, like, you know, blow any fleas out and then gets into the little crevices and stuff like that. So we make sure like, hey, if this dog has fleas, let's wash them right away, let's kill those fleas, let's get them down the drain and clean up in between. You know. So every dog, once they're done, then yeah, there's a cleaning process that the groomers have to do to keep the van clean and not the spread of fleas to other dogs once we're done and going to the next client. So we make sure of all that. So, yeah, yeah, so those things it matters.

Speaker 2:

All those little things are what matters. This is why I'm so impressed with why I wanted to do this whole podcast, because I didn't know the stuff. You know what's our rule If it's interesting to us, it's gonna be interesting to other people. So, but you know, I've had, you've been servicing Dodger here for probably a couple of years now.

Speaker 4:

Yes.

Speaker 2:

And Ross just had his first experience and the first thing Ross told me is I can't believe how nice she was. I go. You don't understand. Every single person that they have sent over here, for Dodger has been just like that. I mean that, and Ross said before, it's so important that somebody is caring about you know the dog yeah, I have a great the dog care, yeah. He loves to say hi. So how do you find? How do you find these people? Because anybody who's run a business or been in charge of people who had to hire people, you know how hard it is not only to get a good person but to retain them.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so that comes with our hiring team. I give a lot of credit to Cynthia, who goes through the process of hiring all these groomers, but also a lot of recommendations come from other groomers. You know people who wanna try us out or be on the team that there's a process that you have to go through, an interview process. That's very. You know down to the points of what we're looking for and you know we wanna get the best people to serve as art people. You get me. So we want the best people who are gonna ask the right questions, who know, in case there's a certain situation, how are they gonna act within that situation. So there's a process that we have to go through to find these right people. But also what comes with it is like a ride-along. So there's a day when we bring them along like I'ma go on Monday or something.

Speaker 2:

That was six weeks ago. We had a. Was that Lisa who came?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, that was Lisa. Okay, yeah, that's how you met her. Yeah, that's how we met her. That's the first time, right? Yeah, that's how we.

Speaker 2:

She knew right away when she pulled up. She knew Dodger's gonna be teaming the beginning of anything else and she was ready for it.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah. So we go through a training process. So one of the biggest things that impacts our company is doing it ride-along with our groomers, making sure, like I wanna see how they interact, versus just being like, oh, you're a groomer, oh you've been grooming, Cool, that's awesome. But I only because you're telling me Doesn't mean I gotta believe you. You know, I wanna see the work, so I wanna see the action. So when you have this dog or you have this client in front of you, how are you gonna act? What are the questions you're gonna ask? You know, Because a lot of people are like, yeah, I'm just a groomer, and a lot of people are just like, yeah, I'm just doing this, just to do it. You know, we wanna find the right people exactly.

Speaker 3:

Exactly and that's what I found my first time using you guys yesterday and I will tell you she was. I was impressed.

Speaker 2:

I was really Ron's first time with a mobile groomer. He's always taking his dogs to other you know good bourbon groomers, but I kind of talked him into this one, saying I think you're gonna like this, ron. So I think it's you gotta find how convenient it is and how you know it's really a. You know, especially getting that dog in the car and everything else is just sometimes a lot of work.

Speaker 3:

Exactly, but I will also say we all have smartphones. She texts me when she was there.

Speaker 2:

Yep.

Speaker 3:

She texts me when Duchess was done. You know we're ready to come in All this communications back and forth. In fact I'm glad you did that because you had texted me that your 230 appointments coming and I had to pick up my granddaughter and Craig and I had to switch. I was a little panicked because I had to leave at a certain time we're gonna work out. But you know, when they were there, when she was there yesterday, I took a shower. I got done. When she was done I was able to put Duchess away, she's crepe drain, so she stayed in her crepe and then I was able to go on my. And then she came here, her daughter.

Speaker 4:

We have a lot of clientele who, especially in the Calabasas and Nagora Hills and Thousand Nogos area, who clients are like hey, my door's open Because sometimes we'll come at 8 am. They're like, hey, I ran out for an errand and they're in the laundry room. Okay, cool, they leave the door open for us. They have so much of a trust for us because we showed that to them. We've proven that, hey, we're a company that you can trust. We're not just like here, oh, we're just making a transaction. No, we wanna make it, you know.

Speaker 3:

It's funny you say that, because if I had to go get my granddaughter I was gonna leave the front door she was parked 10 feet from it and tell her just go ahead and put Duchess in her crate and just turn the door, and I'll be back in 15 minutes. But I was there, still there, and, like I said, she knew how to handle Duchess. She said she's had some big dogs but she was very I mean, she's not that big of a girl but she could handle Duchess real well. Yeah, exactly.

Speaker 4:

So, yeah, that's the thing that I love about our clients that they really trust us. They trust us with their, obviously their extension of their family that we were talking about before, and they also let us go into their houses and be like it's okay, come on in.

Speaker 2:

I've got bad news. I was just a little easier. I said we're done, just come on in and I'll meet you. She came around and it makes it easier on me. Yeah, exactly, so I appreciated that.

Speaker 3:

Well, that leads me up to another question we had asked before. You have all the other, all the requirements besides. I don't know if groomers have to have a certificate or anything, but you're also bonded, you're also insured, all those things. Because when you leave a dog into somebody else's hands and you turn on the TV any day and you hear these horse stories where a dog accidentally died at a groomer, I mean, but you guys are, you are animal lovers. That leads us. Craig had written some pre-questions and I love the next one. Are dogs the majority of your business? Now I was curious do you do reptiles, camels, bulls? Do we have a sound effect or something there?

Speaker 2:

How about they ever do a? That's a pig. I don't think we do pigs.

Speaker 4:

Oh, we don't do pigs. We don't do pigs, not yet.

Speaker 2:

Okay, how about a no cows?

Speaker 4:

No cows yet.

Speaker 2:

And then occasionally maybe a perky. No, no not yet.

Speaker 3:

But do you do dogs and cats? And we are getting we do have dogs here.

Speaker 2:

You know what we got there, we go there it is Sounds like Dodger. I'm sure we'll hear that on our headphones, cause we heard Dodger heard that right now He'd be going nuts.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah. So yeah, we do dogs right now. With Lisey joining our team, she has expanded our diagram with cats now, so it's really helpful to have her on board, and we have an experienced groomer also, martine, who has that experience as well, so we'll see if he wants to venture into cat grooming now too. So we'll see. You know, that's something that I've always wanted to get into, but I never have, just because I never grew up with cats, and cats are a little different when it comes to reading them out or like knowing their temperaments and like knowing how they're going to move. Oh, they are.

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean, dodger loves water. You turn the hose on, he wants to run into it. Cats, I think, aren't cats like. I don't want to get near the water type.

Speaker 3:

But I don't think you normally are going to bathe the cat, but they need their nails trimmed, their ears cleaned.

Speaker 4:

Okay, so you can actually bathe the cat.

Speaker 3:

Really.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, a lot of groomers and a lot of.

Speaker 3:

Do you wear armored gear?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, no, you don't wear armored gear.

Speaker 2:

You probably just nails first, though, right, you do nails before you put the cat in the Honestly, I don't know what the process is like.

Speaker 4:

I've seen one of my managers actually get attacked by a cat that was brought into a salon at the time when I was working still for one of these corporations Bit him up on his arm. He had to go to the hospital right away. You know, get probably like some type of shot for a cat.

Speaker 3:

Well, that brings up. You know you talk to vet techs and people that work at an animal at a hospital. They get bit all the time. Has any of your groomers ever? You know, I don't want to hold up that one finger. You know that go home with a bite or anything.

Speaker 4:

Yet no, honestly, that's one thing that I've told everyone. You know, what comes with the job is kind of like, you understand, dogs are going to react a certain way, right, they have a certain temperament, just kind of like us humans. You know, some days are going to be amazing and great and they're going to be like loving, and then there's going to be moments where they're just annoyed, you know. They're like I just don't want to do this and that's okay too, you know. That's why, by training them and knowing their temperament or like the signs of like stress, or the signs of like hey, I don't like that, I'm giving you a warning. Understand, like, that was a warning. That's not a bite, that's you know. So knowing those signs can prevent from a groomer getting bit. Has a groomer ever gotten bit? Yes, I've gotten bit. Other groomers have gotten bit. That's just what comes with the job. You know it's kind of like you know you're working with live animals, so it's kind of one of those things that you can't really steer away from. But it's actually something that, if you read the signs once again, you have the proper training you can prevent from happening.

Speaker 3:

Yes, and again, like I said, she knew, labs are lovable animals, labs, bolden retrievers. They're lickable and they love you and they're temperament. You can put them with a newborn baby and they'll lick the kid's face, you know. But there are some dogs that just don't like to be messed with.

Speaker 2:

And if your groomer knows that, and a dog can kind of read the person too. Dogs have a good intuition when it comes to. It's so funny with Dodger. Before Ross got it now he started barking. You walked in and he didn't bark once, not once. And Ross was just unusual.

Speaker 3:

I came in the dog, I had a fit. I mean she just he. I'm sorry, sorry, Sorry, dodger.

Speaker 2:

You know, he just barking and I kept saying you know he should know me by now, but it worked. It's just interesting how dogs just you know we have. There's two other people who come here a lot and Dodger just wants no part of them, and other people come in and that's just all about them, yeah nice and calm.

Speaker 3:

She even said yesterday, when she was done, duchess had a totally different. I mean she could probably. Duchess was very friendly to her and there was that dog trust you know so.

Speaker 4:

That's one thing that I've been told throughout my career is that I get a dog that for some reason has had a bad experience at a salon or with their own groomer that they've been seeing for like five years, and then I just come in and I think just having the environment and you know me, having that calm energy, does help out a lot, you know. So I've been told like I can't believe you did my dog, my dog didn't bite you. Like they're always worried, like are your fingers okay? Like you know, that's the first thing. I'm like, I'm good, I'm okay, and honestly it just comes with, like I said, having that energy, that vibe of like everything's gonna be okay, everything's okay. You know, like no one's trying to hurt you, we'll go up to what you allow me, you know. So, depending if you let me get one nail done, that's all we're gonna do. That is okay. Let's not push it, let's take it slow.

Speaker 3:

I don't know how any dog and I know no dog likes having their anal glands cleaned. Oh, I don't wanna go into that, but it's something that dogs don't like. But it's dogs. For them it's very painful If they're not normally you know cleaned and checked.

Speaker 2:

Okay with that said. You know, the typical service takes about an hour and 20 minutes or so an hour and 15, in that area.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, it really depends. If it's like someone like that just can take like an hour five, an hour 10 at most, depending on how they do right, like how they enjoy the water, whether they enjoy the dryer, that can push out the timing right. Someone like for Dodger obviously Dodger has thicker coat, longer hair, so the drying process can take longer, so that can be pushed to an hour 30, hour 40, you know, just really depends.

Speaker 2:

So how, in that hour, let's say, a typical dog is probably an hour 10, let's say right, let's say yep. What goes on in that hour 10? What's the whole process? You start off doing one. What's the process you go through to get to that hour and 10?

Speaker 4:

Okay, so every groomer basically has their own routine. So we all have like a certain routine of how we do things. You know, it's more of how they feel like.

Speaker 2:

Let's talk about you. What do you do?

Speaker 4:

first, so me myself. So when I get, a dog.

Speaker 3:

It's a shower in the morning. Oh, you mean with a dog? Yeah, with a dog, not me.

Speaker 2:

Oh boy.

Speaker 4:

Exactly. So, basically, once I get the dog in, I put them right on the table and the first thing that I like to knock out the way is the pre-work, meaning the ears, and then the nails, and then if I have to shave the paw pads, because there's usually hair underneath, then I'll shave that off. Okay, those are the main things that I like to tackle, and then, if they need some brushing, then I'll do some pre-brushing right. Once I'm done with that, like I said, I use the wrench to open up the pole, move that and just have the dogs walking. And if it's a small dog, that's like 10 pounds, and yes, I'll carry them into the tub. And then now the washing process happens. When the washing process happens, that's where we start with putting eye wash in their eyes to get any debris of like any, like lint or like any pre-shampoo that might be in there. Wash your face with blueberry facial, so we apply that and then start washing the body.

Speaker 2:

Okay, that's people from Hollywood or something. Huh yeah, yeah, it's like the facial see.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, and then you're just like really scrubbing them, and that's the thing. That's where the magic happens. Where you really have to get into it and I feel like a lot of people forget that's where the coat tends to feel soft afterwards is when you're really grinding in the soap into the follicles of the hair, you know, getting it down to the bottom of the root, versus just kind of like, oh, I'm just putting soap, oh I'm just going to tap, tap, tap here. No, it's actually getting in there, getting into their paws, you know, getting around the private areas, getting under the tail and all that. It's really getting in there and then rinsing them, of course, and then doing it all over again.

Speaker 3:

So I will say last night, every time I looked at Dutchess, she shined.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Her coat was so different and Lab's shed. I can make a new carpet every day. Yes, I bought a new one of these shark shark vacuums and it picks up. I could vacuum every day. Last night her coat was magical, Awesome.

Speaker 2:

What happens when you see you bring a dog out and they run in the yard. The first thing they do they go over to a dirty area and just roll around the dirt and you just see the oh no.

Speaker 4:

Yes, that's what I'm like.

Speaker 2:

That's a dog being a dog, you know.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah. So usually, like I said, this is another thing. I want to see who has more hair that comes off their body, either Dodger or Dutchess. Next time I want to record that. You know I'm going to collect all the hair and be like put it into a trash bag.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I've had people come to my. I had a nurse come into my house and I would vacuum and put it in the in the he'd go. That isn't from Dutchess. Is that a month worth of vacuuming? I said no, two days. And she goes what, yeah?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, no, that's, that's what it is. Lab.

Speaker 2:

Now, this time of year it's a lot less shedding, isn't it? Aren't dogs, coats, kind of seasonal to a point too? Yes, they shed a lot more, and the winter they actually don't, right? Is that I never really? Somebody told me that I never realized that before.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, yeah, there's. Depending on the season, it definitely affects them more, but also it depends if their owners are basically brushing them out as well, so that can impact the coat as well, I need to be a better owner.

Speaker 2:

In all honesty, he does not like when I. He loves when I scratch him and stuff. He doesn't like when I. He doesn't like the brush. It's weird, I don't know why. You know I had nobody's ever hit him with it or, you know, slapped it or anything else. It would have been a bad experience. But he just he doesn't like objects. He skittish with objects, anything.

Speaker 4:

That's the one thing that I've realized that when a lot of our clients tell us stuff like that, like we're like, oh, like, your dog seems a little mad at today, or something like that, Right, We'll tell them. And they're like, yeah, my dog doesn't like when I brush on the like they'll argue with me or they'll cry or they'll try to, like, you know, think it's playtime. And then when I tell them, well, with us, they do fine, like you know, they just allow us. I don't know if it's because we're not their owner, so they're just like oh, I'm just like you know, just do what you have to so I can get out of here.

Speaker 3:

I will say that our dogs know us pretty well.

Speaker 4:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

I've had this Dutchess can't have toys because typical labs should eat them, but I give her those knee bones that are hollowed out. You know I mean real bones yeah. And I'll put peanut butter in there. And now her new thing is every time I turn around, this bone is coming in, either getting dropped next to me or on my desk, and she'll look at me. Go peanut butter, please.

Speaker 4:

I love that.

Speaker 3:

I don't know how to stop it. I know my groom or my buddy, my trainer buddy, would say just stop doing it. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

She can't. That dog looks at you and you just can't.

Speaker 4:

We give in. That's the point, you know. I think that's where it happens a lot and I hear that a lot too where they're just like you know, if they cry enough or whine enough, where they're just like don't brush me, then obviously we'll give in, We'll be like oh, that's my baby, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

And I get it, you know. But like I said, once they come to us as groomers they kind of know like okay, they're just going to have to do it.

Speaker 3:

You know it doesn't work the same way as like how it is with their mom or dad at home Is there a certain, and I think that, coming thinking about the different pets, there are one certain dog you do more of, because now you got these English bulldogs that are very popular. You got these little tiny. What did you call them?

Speaker 4:

Shitzu yeah, but bless you.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and these little tiny Pekines, and these little pomegranates, yeah, pomegranates.

Speaker 4:

Pomegranates, pomegranates.

Speaker 3:

Sorry about that, folks. You know, pomegranates don't shed, yeah, no. But they taste good. What kind? Of? What are you doing most of? I mean, is there any certain?

Speaker 4:

dog that yeah, yeah, yeah. So I feel like the community went towards I love them and all but Uh-oh, uh-oh, here it comes. They went down the side of doodles, so doodles is.

Speaker 3:

My son has a golden doodle. I and that dog is funny. When we got that dog my son was working so I drove the car out to Agora to a breeder and that dog rode in the back seat with my daughter-in-law. Yeah, every time I go in their house that dog goes crazy over me. She knows when I'm there and it's just so amazing. But that dog to their two kids and I've known other people. I know a lot of people in Burbank that have golden doodles. They're amazing dogs. The local fire dispatch just got a golden doodle. That is a therapy dog.

Speaker 2:

And now is that now a Dalmatian.

Speaker 3:

No, no, they got a golden doodle. Oh, dalmatian, and it is for. You know, therapy, you know when you're stressed out. She goes to police departments and fire departments in the Verdugo area, the golden doodles. I know a kid that was allergic to peanuts at church and they would bring their dog in the only dog that was allowed on church and that dog could go into a room and like that no, there was peanuts in that room and would sit at the door. The kid couldn't go into that room then. That's what you say you know and how they can teach. But I also love watching on some of these YouTube's. Now, these dogs, these rescue dogs, or these dogs that can find cadavers, you know, or find what was the one the other day, electronic devices, they have labs that are trained.

Speaker 2:

Well, you know that dogs, the very first sense they have when they're born is smell. They don't have, they can't see that. Your eyes aren't open yet. The first sense is smell and that's why dogs do sniff things out so well, because it's their first sense.

Speaker 4:

And it was so powerful.

Speaker 3:

And well, like I said, I saw this some school is using. They hid a flash drive inside of something. They put the and the dog found the flash drive.

Speaker 4:

I mean they do that Like doesn't that. Yeah, that's so interesting, Like how do you train a dog to be like? Hey, find this device, Like the device, have a certain distinct smell to it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 4:

I would say yeah you know that's what I'm thinking Because, like I understand, when it comes to drugs like, especially like marijuana, right, that's so distinctive of a smell Like you can train a dog, but yeah, we can smell that, you know. Yeah, exactly, but what is it about a USB drive? They?

Speaker 3:

say when they're young, when they're manufactured, there's a scent and that's how they, they train them. But I've seen other dogs at the airport. You've seen small dogs looking for food, or you know vegetables or whatever. It just blows me away. Dogs are so intelligent, besides man's best friend, you know, I mean.

Speaker 4:

I was actually just telling my friend about this. It's a video. Once again, it's a video on tiktok going around going viral right now about a dog named bunny. I believe it's some type of doodle as well.

Speaker 2:

Who names their dog bunny?

Speaker 4:

It's a type of golden doodle or doodle, yeah, that basically the mom has these. What is it called? They're called from staples, where you tap it.

Speaker 1:

It's like that's easy, or it has a certain saying to it right.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so I passed it around to my friend because I was like this is so interesting, but the dog is having like a midlife crisis because it would tell the mom like I want to go on a walk. So we'll click the walk button and the mom's like okay, walk later, so she'll like talk to them too, but with simple, like phrases you know, simple, something where the dog can understand or like outside, and then, stranger like it would put like you know something where you can understand it as well. But basically the the dog is going through a midlife crisis where he wants to know why is he a dog. So he says dog bunny. And the mom is like how do I answer that? Like how do I tell this dog like you're just a dog, you know. So the mom would just be like Dog bunny, and that's it, you know. And the dog is like on anti-depressants now, wow.

Speaker 3:

Well, I do know Canine dogs shrink. Yeah, well, there are. Yeah, I, you know, I've worked with and I've seen Burbank's canine. Yeah and how they train and how they search certain temperatures they like. When it's a certain degree out, the dog can work. But again, those officers and those dogs To search out, I've been on numerous searches and when they find somebody you don't give up, that dog will let you know. Yeah, you know, but then when they are not on, not working, there is friendly, as can be.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, when, when I first started my my bathing career Back at Petsmart, I had a enough duty police officer who would bring his canine to me, and it was a shepherd that only could be serviced by myself, because I guess, like we had like this kind of like Introduction where he was like I need you to step out the salon, I need to introduce you to this dog. Um, then, once the dog smelled you, you're like the only one who can touch him. I literally, like he would come late night with like the salon was the slowest and, yeah, the dog would just be serviced by myself. But yeah, the dog could only be washed a certain way, touch the certain way, like he like broke everything down to me, like you know, once was it a Belgian melon?

Speaker 3:

Well, that's the most common.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, no, I think this was some type of German shepherd or German shepherd mix at the time that I recall. But yeah, it was a lovable dog.

Speaker 3:

I know Burbank has gotten dogs that A couple of them are good PR dogs, yeah, and some of them You're not gonna take on to a school playground. You can't show, show and tell.

Speaker 4:

no, you know, and the handler knows that yeah, yeah, you know that's, that's more up to the handler and and you know the ones who are definitely training them they should know and make that call.

Speaker 3:

Well, I happen to know Burbank had a dog, mm-hmm, ate through metal in the officers vehicle His vest, his cavilar vest. The dog ate through it. Now Usually people say your dog's bored. But no, this dog was just determined to ruin everything you finally had to bring. Get the dog back, give it back and change dogs. But that officer and then I know of a canine officer that dog barked. I don't know how you can hear that. You know drive and have that dog barking. But when they go on calls, if they're rolling code three lights and siren, the dog knows they're going to work and they get up, they get excited for that and that's their, their drive. That's their drive, yeah, yeah exactly, I love that.

Speaker 2:

So you're talking about doing the canine at the back of the pet smart days. Do you get special requests from people? Now? I mean other special requests you kind of have to. They say, hey look, I need you to do this or this or this.

Speaker 4:

You'll be four and or yeah, pretty standard nowadays so, when it comes down to special requests, it only brings up one topic, which is with celebrities that we deal with. So with celebrities we have to sign an NDA. Yeah, we have to sign an NDA before. Sometimes we talk to their assistants and then we sign our NDA. You know, we can't take pictures, or you know, deal with certain things or like whatever you see, basically you can't talk about it you know so basically, I'm like I didn't. I'm here to groom, that's it, you know.

Speaker 3:

In this town. That's a big thing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you know what their privacy is, and especially with kids. They wanted her kids ever shown or anything, or yeah, very yeah, and their dogs it was a lady Gaga who had her, yeah, dogs. I mean, they knew that she had those dogs, you know. So you can't, you can't let the public see it, see what they have you know, my son works on a couple of shows.

Speaker 3:

What's it called the America's Got Talent? Oh, that's awesome yeah and he also does dancing with the stars. You won't even tell me who's on the show. Yeah, so we talk every day on it's coming home. You want to say you're gonna win in advance. Nope you don't want to make money, even talk you won't even talk about around his house because his daughters are so smart. But he, he has learned. Yeah, it's just they now. Yeah, these companies you know that's a big thing. Yeah, lots of money involved.

Speaker 2:

Celebrities I'm glad you know those kind of clients, so that's good.

Speaker 4:

Because, they have to trust you exactly that's what it is and you know, obviously we want to do what's right for them and you know that, like that's one thing that I've always realized, even when I started out my younger years Grooming when I would see a celebrity is just like she don't, like they're a regular individual, you know, don't like, I get it. They have a higher status. Even like when I was working at a peco and on Hollywood and Western, angelina Jolie would walk in, you know, and I would get phone calls. She wouldn't bring her dogs in, but I would answer like the Salesforce to help them out. I'd pick up phone calls and they're like oh um, we know that Angelina is at your store. What is she buying? Can?

Speaker 2:

you tell them yeah, yeah they would call us for information.

Speaker 4:

We're like you guys know we're not gonna do that, like Regardless that. I know that's your job. Then you have to come and look at that or whatever they're doing, but we're not gonna do your job for you. You know, um, especially, like I said, we want them to feel comfortable when they walk into our, our locations or you know whatever. They won't come back.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know, this is a real informational podcast and I'm glad you just brought that up because people need to know. I'll tell you, as I said earlier, I trust you with my dog, but also trust you with that type of information. Yeah, yeah, um, people are very private, yeah, and they don't want stuff like that to get out.

Speaker 4:

So I'm glad you said that, because people that hear this podcast Know that you guys aren't fooling around, you're just not you know, have some people grooming you and yeah, the biggest thing, too that I I really enjoyed about, um, seeing Angelina At the store was that she like walked in and she felt like she felt safe, you know, and it was. It was a good feeling to feel like that and being around that environment, because I can tell like, as a celebrity, you get so overwhelmed, you know, you're like guys like yes, I know I'm a celebrity, I know I've done so much like amazing work, but at some time, like I do, I am a human being that wants to spend time with my kids and her kids would literally Holly walking, like every other day, with their security guard, of course, and the security guard would just stand and we would talk to him like hey, like how's your day going? How's you know Anything interesting happened today? And he would tell us, yeah, paparazzi is outside, you know they're swarming us, you know we have to make certain routes, take certain fake vehicles here, and I'll just like that's interesting, like that intrigues me a lot, you know, because it's like their lives are different too, or impacted a different way, because they're not going to see it the way I grew up, you know. So, knowing that, like I said, yeah, we, we keep that integrity and that honesty and we want to make sure that everybody feels comfortable with us. You know, not feeling like, oh, this might happen, they might leak this out. You know it's funny you say that I've been doing photography for 50 years.

Speaker 3:

I've done a ton of stuff with this LA question center, sticellone, and you know a ton of celebrities used to come there. One of the things I'm not a paparazzi, I don't sell to those type of publications and they knew that I would shoot their parties and they didn't have to worry when those pictures are going to show up. They're going to them because you're my client. They're not going to anywhere else. You want to release them, that's up to you. But again, it's that trusted and and I'll tell you, I've been doing this for 50 years and I've shot some pretty Up their people. You know I remember them bringing out, you know colognes and introducing that and polo players that you know and you just learn Some people are into that paparazzi thing. Yeah, you won't see me doing it. And same thing with bats. It's one of the biggest things that I've realized with mobile grooming and you know, servicing different types of clientele, especially celebrities.

Speaker 4:

You build such a great relationship with them because, obviously, depending on how often you're seeing them, like after any clients that I see on the weekly, bi-weekly, obviously, I have clients that I see monthly, six weeks depending, you know, depending on what their dogs are getting service for. But, yeah, just building that great relationship with them helps out a lot for them to keep their clients and I think that's a great way to build a relationship with them. Helps out a lot for them to trust you, to get to a place where, hey, walk on in, like you know, or like hey, for, like, I've been invited to celebrities houses for Thanksgiving, like, hey, come, come in, like what are you doing for Thanksgiving? Like you want to come enjoy food with us and you know, like I obviously want to go and see like how that that whole environment's like, but at the same time, too, I'm like, hey, like you know, I would love to, but obviously I'm gonna spend time with family as well. You know, um, if not, like, the best time that I love too is Christmas. That's where, like you know, we're getting gifts that people are coming by that, like you know, they'll bring us like a whole wine bottle, like, hey, enjoy this, you know, take this home with you. We're like, oh, thank you appreciate that, you know. So anything given to us, we we adore and we love the most. So you know, we we never complain.

Speaker 3:

So well, it says. I know Craig wrote up on our show notes here. Mm-hmm, I keep hitting this funny button. It's not okay not coming my way. I don't always do this operational. Yeah no, it looks. So I'm curious. Yeah, what's the best way besides seeing your gorgeous van out and about?

Speaker 2:

great white vans around Burbank.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, but I mean?

Speaker 2:

and how did you cope with the name supreme perfection PAW. Not perfect perfection PAW? Was that you did? Is that, is that your brainstorm one day?

Speaker 4:

brainstorming with, with my brothers, my team, you know, my friends, kind of giving names out there. You know, I just wanted something that's very Gonna put our stamp in the world. You know, giving a shout out to, to like certain names that were like, okay, this might be catching. Then we would practice for a week and be like, hey, how would this sound if I call you on the phone like thank you for calling so-and-so, you know? And then after a while we're just like a lot of people are going down with obviously supreme and the supreme name and stuff. But we're just like you know what, what about? We put supreme but instead of perfection, because we're thinking per, but that's more of a cat. So we're like, but let's, if we ever deal with cats and dogs, then we have paws, you know. And obviously dogs and cats have paws, you know. So we're like you know what, let's go with paw affection, you know, kind of saying like oh, it's a perfect name. Yeah, the supreme works of everything you know, and that's one thing. We want to treat everybody like royalty here, so everybody's getting the supreme works.

Speaker 2:

So you see those big white vans driving around and they can always tell you, get your number and find you there. Yeah, but how? How's the best way for those right now who are not gonna run for the van? That's the best way for people to get a hold of you right now if they're interested in getting your services.

Speaker 3:

What, what? The social media yeah?

Speaker 4:

Yeah, so we have social media. We have our Instagram. That's like NK individuals on there that you know we promote mostly on on Instagram. Like I said, we're trying to go with TikTok, but and it's you go.

Speaker 2:

Aren't you going live on Instagram tonight? Yeah, we're going live right now.

Speaker 4:

So we're going live right now, so we have a lot of viewers, yeah going on, but basically they can get a hold of us through our phone numbers. Email supremepopfactioncom.

Speaker 2:

Our phone numbers 213, 421-1509 if you want to contact us there open that description for people to yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 4:

But they can, like I said, call us, text us, email us. Our concierge team will definitely, you know, get to them.

Speaker 2:

Your concierge team.

Speaker 4:

I like that within like two to five minutes of being contacted, you know. So we're always looking for ways to expand as well, so, but Instagram is the best way right now.

Speaker 3:

Yeah well, when we, when we started this podcast, we said we have a couple of questions in be 1520 minutes. We're now looking at our countdown timer getting close to an hour doing this for about an hour and you were worried.

Speaker 4:

I was worried.

Speaker 3:

Pretty simple, we got. We also got a shout out for your brother. Yes, yes, you know, so it was right and, like I said, you've answered a ton of our questions and hopefully we've answered what some people That'll listen to this pie no, people are gonna listen to the podcast for sure, mm-hmm and hopefully you'll get some clients. You're going everywhere. You said you're not only Burbank, but you go out. We go.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, seriously, we, we LA's in surrounding areas. So basically from here to Calabasas of Gora Hills, we go down to the Palisades and Amonica, we go down to Inglewood, we go down to East LA, we go to Pasadena. The furthest we've gone down that way would be Whittier, but we had to kind of pull it back a little bit. You know, yeah, so we're trying to stay in certain areas because obviously we have so many clientele's in now with our booking system and another helpful Trate that we have on our books is that we target specific areas in specific days. So if, like, mondays are Burbank, then we have all our Burbank clients on Mondays. You know, if that doesn't end up working out, then we'll work with another day. But you know, we have like a Gora Hills on Tuesdays, we have Beverly Hills on Wednesdays. So we attack each day a certain way and you know that was a great Idea of the concierge team that came out, I know you're expanding to it.

Speaker 2:

We talked earlier. You're expanding a few more bands and everything else and I'm very happy for you. Like I said, I I've used the service now for a couple years, been extremely happy, and I just thought it's really we're sharing with people, because this is not the kind of thing they, you, you know you don't drive down the street and see a mobile group, but you see mobile groomers always driving around, but until you experience one, and a good one, you know, you don't know what you're at. I'll tell you what. Now, russ, I'm not sure I have not been to a regular groomer in years. I don't, I'm not sure, a real room in charges nowadays.

Speaker 3:

Oh, I think it depends on the dog.

Speaker 2:

Okay, I think I'm only paying 20 or $40 more than I used to pay a few years ago For mobile service where it's all convenient, comes right to my house. To me it's my time is worth more than and and I, like I say I'm more worried about my dog sitting in a cage for five hours somewhere Than anything else. That's that's the thing that bothers me. I look at it from his point of view. You know I can't stand if he's miserable.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, exactly.

Speaker 2:

Yes, live with me.

Speaker 4:

That's miserable enough and the thing too is that, um, with puppies, that's definitely a thing that you don't want them to get. That experience of, like I'm gonna sit in this kennel and Not want to say, like, learn bad habits, but Necessarily learn bad habits like, oh, these dogs are Barking and biting the bowls and stuff that we would have for them. It's like they'll pick that up and then they'll start doing it. You know so. But hold on quote great training that you do at home might not be the same, you know, when they take them into a salon.

Speaker 3:

So well, that was the thing. My previous dog was great trained. I'm Dutch. Is this great trained? When I go out of my house I don't have to come back to his shoes being eaten, you know, furniture being chewed. She knows that's her house. You know, from day one a lot of people don't like Kate training, but it's the best thing. I have been recommended by my dog trainer. Yeah, and that both my dogs and I In fact. Now that just knows when I got to get out of the house. Yeah, should go to her crate. Yeah, to get a treat. But she'll also know that's. That's boom.

Speaker 4:

Yeah, a lot of the things that we hear, because obviously when we get a lot of dogs, they come into us very anxious and a lot of times it's because of the separation anxiety and obviously your dog trainer can obviously, you know, speak on that. But I feel like a lot of people feel like I have a puppy, so I'm asleep with my puppy, and that's the worst thing you can do. You know, I understand you want to show them love, but there's also A line where you have to understand like, hey, crate, train them. That's going to help them out in the long run.

Speaker 3:

I learned real early you could take a Kong toy or a bone, yes, put something in it for long enough to you for you to get out of the house and that dog is not going to remember what time you left. And that's what I've always done and it has worked. I mean, for several dogs my trainer buddy said you know, do this, yeah, and when I don't do that, yeah, that's just going to bark when I close the door. But if you give her something that she will occupy her time, that works.

Speaker 2:

Well, ross, our first business showcase that you and I have done. I'm pretty, I was pretty happy with it, how you feel.

Speaker 3:

Well for me, who's done several podcasts, I want to ask, mark, I mean you were worried when you came in. How do you feel now?

Speaker 4:

I feel relaxed, I feel At ease now. I love the environment, I love the energy and you know obviously. Thank you for the great questions and absolutely.

Speaker 2:

Mark Flores, the pre-empower affection. We thank you, our dogs Thank you and hopefully, if you are needs some mobile grooming, give them a call. I I know we're, we're. We highly recommend, we're not just doing this For any reason, we highly recommend this and we've both have had the service.

Speaker 3:

So and to go out. Before we sign out, I think we got to at least have Dodger bark or some barking.

Speaker 2:

There we go, we got something for you, right, okay, mark?

Speaker 4:

Thank you very much, thank you, guys, appreciate it.

Speaker 2:

We'll talk to you all next time, thank you.

Speaker 4:

See you guys.

Speaker 1:

My burbank talks would like to thank all of my burbanks advertisers for their continued support. Burbank water and power to samano real estate group, you, me credit union, burbank chamber of commerce, gain credit union providence, st Joseph medical center community, chevrolet, media city credit, ucla health, tequila's. Burbank logics credit union, hill street cafe, pertain, escobar wealth management and the ups store on third street.

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