myBurbank Talks

The Week That Was and That Will Be - October 23

October 23, 2023 Craig Sherwood, Craig Durling, Ross Benson Season 1 Episode 57
myBurbank Talks
The Week That Was and That Will Be - October 23
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Burbank, a vibrant city with an equally dynamic community, never ceases to impress with its latest initiatives and events. In our latest podcast episode, we navigate through the varied landscape of Burbank, shedding light on its commendable healthcare initiatives, behind-the-scenes work at the Police Commission, and exciting Halloween preparations.

Starting with a noteworthy mention of Providence St Joseph Medical Center, we delve into the newly opened urgent care center that operates seven days a week with extended hours. A major step forward in healthcare accessibility, the center is sponsored by the philanthropic Cusumano family. The family's significant contributions to our community are a testament to their dedication to enriching Burbank.

Next, we move on to the intricate workings of the Police Commission. The commission's meetings, their clear agenda (or sometimes the lack thereof), and the history behind the badges and police radios gifted to members in the past make for an interesting discussion. As we navigate through these topics, we also highlight the implications of spending time on reports that may not be used in any meaningful way.

Moreover, the podcast episode takes a deep dive into the city's employee recognition initiatives, exploring what it means for employees to max out their pensions. We discuss the increased competition for police and fire personnel jobs, reflecting on how the perspective towards these jobs has evolved over generations.

A noteworthy point of discussion in the episode is the potential of a bicycle pedestrian bridge linking Burbank across the L.A. River. The feasibility of such a project, its implications, and the accompanying challenges make for a riveting conversation. Also, we decode the proposed parking meter system in Burbank, analyzing its cost-benefit analysis and exploring other parking enforcement options.

With Halloween on the horizon, we bring you the latest updates on city-wide decorations and the much-anticipated 'Harmony of Halloween' performance by the Burbank Community Band. In Ross' Rant, he discusses the challenges posed by death memorials and the need for a clear policy regarding their maintenance.

Finally, we express our gratitude towards local businesses for their continued support to Burbank. Their contributions are an integral part of the city's growth and prosperity. The podcast episode wraps up on an optimistic note, looking forward to the future with excitement.

Overall, our latest podcast episode provides an all-encompassing guide to Burbank, ensuring you stay informed and engaged with our community. From healthcare initiatives to public performances, the episode serves as a testament to the vibrant spirit of Burbank. Tune in and let's navigate through Burbank together!

Speaker 1:

from deep in the Burbank Media District. It's time for another edition of my Burbank Talks, presented by the staff of my Burbank. Now let's see what's on today's agenda as we join our program.

Speaker 2:

Hello everyone. Craig Sherwood here, along with Craig Durling, who now has to say hello also, because we can't hear you on a podcast.

Speaker 1:

Actually I'm waving. Yes, oh, look at, I fell into the trap.

Speaker 2:

And of course Ross Benson.

Speaker 3:

Good morning America how are you? And there's song OK.

Speaker 2:

We find Craig Durling off of assignment.

Speaker 1:

And of course he's leaving on assignment again tomorrow, so you changed the locks and didn't tell me oh look, that is a hint.

Speaker 2:

Well, you know, we do the best we can and that was the best we could.

Speaker 3:

Get me out. Well, now we have these traffic questions. I can, we can ask you.

Speaker 1:

Oh, you saved them all up, did you?

Speaker 3:

Well, this new year we'll get into it. We didn't talk about that in the pre show.

Speaker 1:

Well, let's go you love you, love you, love me.

Speaker 2:

Kerbal's gets a script that we can advance and he doesn't wait till it show time and the ink is still wet on the rundown.

Speaker 3:

Well, you know yeah, we'll get to it.

Speaker 2:

Well, first of all, we need to give a shout out to the George Patties for the great Ed Heather and Pie and of course our waitress Heather our server Heather our very, always very patient with us. She really is great sense of humor, yes, and just great service. I mean, we are our pre, our pre, meeting at Patties every Monday and break bread before we we do.

Speaker 3:

And you think about it. She deals with customers through the dinner hour and everything, and she is always very fun. She gets our drinks. She's a hoot, she really is. He's a hoot, is, and we even she likes cats also.

Speaker 2:

She's a cat. There's two cats.

Speaker 3:

Yep, and we can't. We told George how good she is and he agreed, and he said how many pies you will?

Speaker 2:

Not that he pays us in pie, I'll tell you what you know, patties, on this side of town is like Hill Street on the other side of town, where the service is always good. Yeah, good point. The food is always fresh and it's homemade and they make cakes there every day.

Speaker 1:

But if you're a cake person, they make their own cakes, a couple of their own pies they make the cinnamon rolls every morning.

Speaker 2:

Cinnamon rolls in the morning. Ah, what is the morning?

Speaker 1:

You're good. I like that comparison of it's the Hill Street of. Yeah, it really is the valley and the opposite in.

Speaker 2:

Yeah you go to Hill Street, you can always will get a great meal. I still think Hill Street is one of the biggest secrets in Burbank.

Speaker 1:

You know and we can walk to Patties.

Speaker 3:

Most people don't talk about it, but their restrooms are spotless. They got some nice deodorant in there. They're always clean. How is it now?

Speaker 1:

Well, never mind, never mind, OK, never mind.

Speaker 3:

Onto the news week there will be here we go.

Speaker 2:

Let's start off with the last week. On Tuesday, providence St Joseph Medical Center announced that their urgent care has now opened across the Medical Center in the Cusamano Family Health Center, and it's open seven days a week, ok, so Monday from Friday from 10 am to 7 30 pm, and weekends and holidays from 8 am 5 30 pm. Ross, I thought you talked to one of the doctors there. What do you have to say about?

Speaker 3:

Well, last week I read a little thing from Dr Campo that People don't understand. Instead of occupying the ER, most people come in and with a kid with a you know a hurt finger or a minor injury that can be handled by urgent care. They do X-rays over there now. They can set bones over there now. If it's major, they walk you across the street, but you don't have to go in and hog up.

Speaker 1:

That's a great point, yeah you're clogging up the ER for people that actually need emergency.

Speaker 2:

If it's major, you go to the ER. If it's general, you go to the urgent care. What about if it's an admiral?

Speaker 3:

Oh, cricket, cricket, cricket, we're going to put crickets in you know I understand her point real well because a lot of people complain.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I had to wait three hours in the ER at St Joe, and nothing against families or kids, but kids tend to get sick. They bring stuff home from school and stuff, but the ER is not the place for your kid with the sniffles or a little car or something, that's emergency room and so in this and it's state of the art, you can't miss it.

Speaker 3:

If you go in off a point of this to where the ER is, you look to your left and it says in huge letters Coosamano, urgent care. So that is their new, Don't miss it.

Speaker 2:

And it is a custom on urgent care. Is it probably Coosamano Cancer Center?

Speaker 3:

It's right next to a day.

Speaker 2:

They also are sponsoring the urgent care to.

Speaker 1:

Coosamano Family Health Center. It's called yeah.

Speaker 2:

Yes, it is so a great option for the folks who don't necessarily need once again, and I'm going to say this I hear a lot of people saying oh, the Coosamano, is this Coosamano? Is that in Burbank? You know what? The Coosamano? Thanks to Coosamano's, we have things like that in Burbank where they are giving their money and their time, and you know so, before you set the criticize them about developments, everything else you know, let's remember this part of it also. You know they give back to this community more than anybody else.

Speaker 1:

Very philanthropic.

Speaker 3:

Well, they are, and their, their mother, their grandmother started as a volunteer there and their whole family. There's wings of the hospital that I have been in that they have paid and donated for. So I was thinking we should probably point out this week, if you do drive by St Joe's and you see all the picketing, nurses and other services, how nurses oh, not nurses Other orderlies, people that wheel people to the rooms All those other services are on strike. The hospital is still operational. They we put out an article in my Burbank that everything is. They have people filling in positions and the hospital is ready for any disaster or anything.

Speaker 1:

So they're full. They're fully staffed, according to the hospital.

Speaker 2:

They're fully staffed. Yeah, they brought in extra staff people. My only problem with that whole thing is okay, I get you need, you know that they're right to strike and all that, but you know, they go up by the hospital and they start beating drums and hitting horns and blowing out horns and everything else to be disruptive. You know they, if they were working in there and people from the public came outside and did that while they were working, you know, and they were met, they were interfering with patient care by that, you know, and bothering patients. What gives them the right to do that themselves? I mean, I understand you're on, okay, you're not. Here's your action. You're outside, you're walking your picket signs, you're making public aware hey, we get all that, but you go up there and really and bother the patients who are fighting for their lives. Is that really, you know? Is that really necessary? And I'm very disappointed that those people that they're not looking at it.

Speaker 1:

And at that point they're kind of showing their true colors, maybe because their concern, primary concern, obviously isn't for those people who are trying to recuperate and are recovering from surgeries and ailments and stuff. You know you're out there making all that noise right outside the rooms.

Speaker 3:

Usually, the police department will have an officer go out there and give guidelines. You know what entrances there, how many people can block a driveway at one time.

Speaker 2:

So why it's on the channel seven news actually walked up to the front doors. Yeah they didn't just stay on the sidewalk, they went up to the front doors on private property.

Speaker 3:

At six in the morning, when I looked at four and five, they were both out there. They were out at the street. You know that's your word too.

Speaker 2:

But then all of a sudden, they all walked inside for some reason.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and that's not, you know, striking is. I understand what they're trying to do, yeah, but also, folks think about the people that these are the same people that you need to care for when you go off strike next week for your priorities. Yeah, really.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's a good question. We'll get into that. Um city council meeting on Tuesday night. Last week they honored once they're yearly honoring of the employees. Um, I think one employee actually spent as 45 years with the city. Can you believe that?

Speaker 3:

45. He started off as a summer worker right and he's been there 45 years and he's 127 years old now.

Speaker 1:

Well I, and Ross still has more years with the city.

Speaker 3:

Well, it's funny, you know, I, I watch that whole ceremony and they, they reward people with certificates, for I think it was our city manager, justin, has 25 years. Good for me. I thought he was there longer, but you know, there's some policemen and the other day they have a breakfast. Um, a couple of days later, and I found out, there's some employees that have fathers, mothers, brothers and cousins all working for the city.

Speaker 2:

And I am more, though. Thank you, david Gordon.

Speaker 3:

Oh no, no, no, no, no, they don't work. They can all work for the city, but not for the same department. The Santa valve family.

Speaker 2:

They just can't. They can't work in the same department.

Speaker 1:

So if, if you are, and they certainly can't work for each other if your dad's a fireman and you.

Speaker 2:

We have a policeman because you can't be a fireman.

Speaker 3:

But it you know, good example unless you'll be a fireman, then you have.

Speaker 2:

You have your your dad retire.

Speaker 3:

You know the Santa valve family, like when I saw them the other day. I saw George, I saw I can't think of her name she but they're working with the city before that law. We got to. Yeah, yeah, but it's neat to see that it's a family you know. So on Wednesday we'll get down and I'll talk about a breakfast they had. It was kind of fun.

Speaker 2:

Um, the council that night also meted the ADU policy and the misal code to coincide with state laws. Not a whole lot with that. Uh, they're also decided they're going to start researching about the Armenian Memorial and would like to try and get something at least planned before April. So they have signed report back to their to everybody before the uh Armenian genocide remembrance day. So they are working on that.

Speaker 1:

They already have like a location kind of pencil.

Speaker 2:

No, they hadn't really say about a location, so they've done it They've met every year. They want it to be at city hall. But now, once again, you said in that presence that who else is going to want their memorial or their recognition?

Speaker 1:

So finding an appropriate location will be part of the process. I assume.

Speaker 2:

Oh, but they are. It's something they'd like to do.

Speaker 3:

Um. The next one is kind of colorful.

Speaker 2:

And then the next one is they actually approved an administrative procedure to light city hall in colors, and this is, I guess, maybe one of the only two or three things in the work in the city of Burbank a mayor can actually do so, uh, at the marriage request, and of course there'll be consultation with the city manager too about uh. So you know, different times October I'm sure it'd be pink.

Speaker 3:

Well, I remember the days they literally had gel color and go up and do the gel.

Speaker 2:

But did you hear what they said? They only have six different color lights.

Speaker 3:

Well see, that's what gets me. Is you know why don't they do it now? Put in LEDs. Put in LEDs and you could have a hundred different colors.

Speaker 2:

A hundred, yes, like ten thousand Well that's how long they burn.

Speaker 1:

There aren't that many days on the calendar.

Speaker 3:

You know, but they need to. Now would be a good time To modernize it. To modernize it, put in LEDs now. Nobody working for the city now would ever have to change them. Yeah, you know, because they burned for a hundred thousand dollars.

Speaker 2:

I'm sure they'll modernize it as soon as they get to the Starlight Bowl. By the way, that's a whole different thing. Yeah, that's, that's our antique on the hill. Um.

Speaker 3:

But those two things kind of going together. Viviana, you know she I feel sorry for her. She had to do this study on. Like she said when she did her report, she knows more now about flagpoles than probably anybody in city hall.

Speaker 2:

So Well, let's move on to Wednesday. Our reporter, devin Haranda, and and and, by the way, we are losing Devin Haranda and we're not. You know it's sad for us because how valuable she's been to us, but extremely good for you know what, and I'm glad you know it's like. As a high school coach, my greatest thing was you know when a player would graduate. You'd hate losing that star player, but then the star player would go on to college. He'd get the next level. Well, devin's going to get the next level also. She's going to to Reading, california and being on air personality, I think, a weekend anchor at the news station up there.

Speaker 3:

And real quickly. I just want to say, when Devin came to us, she did not want to do, she wanted to write yeah, and we created YouTube. We created several shows that she hosted. You had made the recommendation.

Speaker 2:

But money's in broadcast journalism. Money's not in written Journal, you know. Ask writers for the LA Times, How's that working out for them?

Speaker 3:

Right, so I would recommend it. Her and her father has experience doing that.

Speaker 2:

Her father is one of the great color analysts in college basketball. You'll see him on all kinds of stations Bill Heranda, and anytime you'll see him on, you know doing games, very knowledgeable, very.

Speaker 3:

So she, you know she's following in his footsteps, but to get a job she came down to LA, you know, and it's a hard.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, the Sacramento area. And when she came to she, you know, she asked us. You know, do we need somebody? I think she's either Glendale or pasting a college at the time and so, yeah, yeah, I think, okay, yeah, we'll give you a try. We always do that and about two stories later never hear from them again. But Devin, you can't come back. And she broke the Pickwick story for us, the SB 35 thing.

Speaker 3:

She's done a lot of great events, so we work together this weekend and tomorrow I will pose a story for the final story with us. Was it the historical society?

Speaker 2:

Historical, I mean historical society.

Speaker 1:

And it is not this story. There's another story, so it's not the story we were talking about.

Speaker 3:

No, we will miss Devin. That was the Road King story she posted last week. There's a lot of stories.

Speaker 2:

So and then in the story she said how the Road Kings have given in this, in this last cycle, $20,000 to five local nonprofits which you know that you see the road Kings out there doing their thing at a car, jenny Carson Park or different events or fundraisers. Well, this is where the money goes. It goes right back to our community to nonprofits that really need the money.

Speaker 3:

And those four or five nonprofits were DTAC, Burbank Police Foundation, the historical or the historical society and Jack Aranda housing.

Speaker 2:

And the fifth, it's dead. Five here.

Speaker 1:

I did pick, that wasn't five.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I thought it was.

Speaker 1:

Oh, roll back the tape. Roll back the tape, start over.

Speaker 3:

They'll have to come up with 10,000 another great local philanthropic. Yes, that's what kings they really are, and she got to know road Kings.

Speaker 2:

Yes, we also posted a story on on Wednesday about McCambers pool and city of Burbank receiving 1.5 million million million To renovate the pool. It's too bad that my kids which is that is operational and does need renovations, but you know, built back in what the 50s but yet Burbank highest pool has now sat idle for three years with no plan on. I'm sure the school board can say, well, if you don't pass the bond measure for us we won't fix the pool. You know I mean that that they're gonna start, they're gonna start holding hostage, but still he's hostage for you to put past the bond measure whole different subject. But you know I'm glad at least with cambers pool is getting the upgrade.

Speaker 3:

Well, I was there for the check passing and we had pictures. I mean they're putting in kind of like for do go aquatic center. A little kids pool now a big slide. The pool will be heated. I don't think many Burbank people know. Here's an underground viewing.

Speaker 2:

Yes, there is, we've, we've both another many times. We have always our Pool open photo every year. You gotta get a jump in the pool and make a face. That the sign. Yeah, well, that was, that was the old days.

Speaker 3:

This is say blub, blub, blub I know I had to go out and buy a new sign every year. We're open.

Speaker 2:

You shouldn't use that erase, blink or whatever. That was that water and unwaterproof ink.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. I turn the blue, the cool, the pool bright red every year if you ever get a chance to watch a water polo game a Glamor game watch it from that tank down below. What is going on under the surface? There's a lot more.

Speaker 2:

That's what they always say, though you know, water polo game, the true action is below the water, and that's a very physical game actually it is I.

Speaker 3:

I was a water polo player in high school. Good old mr Herms.

Speaker 1:

You know what they called you in high school and the water polo team blub, blub, blub.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, just because I'm the size of a whale does mean I can swim at all. So I was never the let's see here. Moving on, oh, the police can be favorite. Your favorite police commission met and that's about. All they do is meet.

Speaker 1:

They received, they met and received.

Speaker 2:

That's it. Um, there they read where it's gonna receive reports that the city staff had to prepare for them and present to them, and what they do about those reports. Oh, thank you very much. You know. If you don't believe me, go to the city website, go to the meeting archive and just watch a Police commission meeting, watch the last one, and tell me if they really do serve a purpose in any way, or ours well, if you're gonna direct people to watch the meeting, those people can learn about the met team. Oh yeah.

Speaker 3:

They can learn what they learned, but here's my problem.

Speaker 2:

You know they get this information in which is great. It's it's great information. What do they do? Do they send the information out to the public? Do they do anything with you? No, they just. It's like we give it. We give information to seven people are they require.

Speaker 1:

They were Required by city charter or something to have a police commission. Is it so? We have to exist.

Speaker 2:

Well, yeah, but they can be like the planning commission and just take weeks off like they are this coming instead of having a meeting. Your gripe is that they have meetings when there's something on the agenda they need to really talk about and maybe we're gonna. Our recommendation to council yes, have the meeting and let's, let's talk about it, but to have a meeting for the sake of a meeting.

Speaker 3:

So I asked one of our commissioners. After Wednesday's meeting I saw him at the Historical Society and I went up to him and I said, and I asked what those reports were for you have not heard about mental health before. You haven't heard from the traffic. You know of how they do this. What was the use of all that time?

Speaker 2:

What do you say? The cricket? I need the crickets for next week.

Speaker 1:

Was it just a shrug? Yeah, he didn't have an answer.

Speaker 3:

He says I don't know. He basically said that. My other question is if you listen, that meeting they have tons of subcommittees.

Speaker 2:

Oh, and some of them didn't even know what they were on anymore. They go. Am I on that?

Speaker 1:

But they did get a good card gig.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I have business cards.

Speaker 1:

They have that gig.

Speaker 2:

Good meeting people.

Speaker 1:

A lot of police commissioners in some cities get badges to. They used to. Yeah, they were misused here in Burbank. That's what.

Speaker 2:

That's what's a ruins it all for not only badges, but we had a police commissioner, johnny Grant, that actually had a police radio in his car.

Speaker 1:

He's Johnny Grant.

Speaker 3:

He's Johnny Grant the mayor of Hollywood. The mayor of Hollywood. But Counselor members also used to get badges. Yeah, you know that old line no, I don't need no stinking badge. What movie is that from? Don't need no stinking batches. They took them away because they were misused.

Speaker 2:

But let me tell you that the first, the first thing if you ever hear from somebody is Don't you know who I am when you hear that line?

Speaker 1:

I've never heard that, yeah.

Speaker 2:

Don't you know who I am? If you hear that line, then say I have no idea.

Speaker 1:

This is one of those towns where everybody's somebody.

Speaker 2:

Don't you know who I am?

Speaker 3:

They're probably the only good part about the police commission when the chief gives up, gets up and gives a counter yeah, it's gonna occur the next month. You write them all down real quick.

Speaker 2:

I just think you've got the tenants there, you got captains, you got a chief just all sitting there all night long just to give these reports out, and how many hours they spend making these.

Speaker 1:

They're probably thinking the same thing. You got a city like what are we doing?

Speaker 2:

You got a city attorney sitting there and even she during the meeting tuned out and because I guess one of the commissioners Was it right Ed, when it got robbed and he had a propane tank and she got a call from somebody saying did he use that propane tank as a weapon? And so when they asked her question is all I was talked my boss about propane tanks. So I mean that's what goes on that meeting. It is absolutely yeah, it's Abner Costello.

Speaker 3:

Did you notice a newest city attorney got up and introduced himself. He's gonna take the prosecution cases. There was a question About the break, or does?

Speaker 2:

let's hope that after they give these people bail on their ticket, they actually show up to get prosecuted.

Speaker 3:

Oh, thanks for bringing that up. I was approached by somebody from as is that Laz, the new parking? Parking yes they are hiring. You want to be a parking control officer? That company is hiring left and right.

Speaker 1:

I know you just can't work your own block.

Speaker 2:

Let's talk about that later in the show. We're gonna bring a las and I'll bring that up and we'll talk about that.

Speaker 1:

So okay, um then under new business.

Speaker 2:

So Thursday, while we had a city employee recognition breakfast, and, of course, when there's only one digit on the clock, you'll never see me get up.

Speaker 3:

I know I was up and we already have an employee night.

Speaker 2:

Well, they do Tuesday night at council and then Thursday they had the breakfast in the morning.

Speaker 3:

Oh, and this year they had a new vendor feeding people. Got a little slow, ran out of food, had to make up, but all the city they started 6, 30 for the guys that are starting the street work trash you know what, and the graveyard folks that are getting trying to get off and they didn't mind waiting for the food.

Speaker 2:

You know why free food they're being paid. That's right. You there, they're not. You know I should be on their day off. Didn't come in for that breakfast.

Speaker 3:

Oh, I saw a couple, yeah, a couple, but they it's. It's really nice. They have a theme. We're gonna put an article in my Burbank to recognize all the people that did get recognized for milestones and they give out prizes and prizes, oh well, gifts, no. It's better than getting recognized for gallstones party favors, but it's people that you know. You work for the city for 10, 20, 30 years.

Speaker 1:

Or, in some cases, 45.

Speaker 2:

Right and get one of those pensions. Oh man, oh. Well, there were three there's Calpers and this love. You know, they just love to give that money out, policeman fireman Public works.

Speaker 3:

I write those are the three that had real long-term employees and I'm told that they honored him at City Hall the 45. He's a custodian now in City Hall.

Speaker 1:

Well, I'm usually the police and fire. The public safety folks are the only ones. The state per's Employees that. Can that max out?

Speaker 2:

I mean they didn't try to, they didn't try to poach him away. Department's trying to poach our cops and firemen. They just they let the city.

Speaker 1:

No, they do that. But but safety people max out so they, they stop Right. You know, increasing pay at a certain amount. As far as retirement, where your teachers, your, your Public services, people that are in per's, they, the lot more years they have on the higher percentage they get in their retirement. They can keep going forever. But, as I was once told, nobody wants 80 year old cops or firemen running around or hobbling around out there. So we usually max out at around 30 35 years after that. You know. The joke was, you know you're basically paying to come to work.

Speaker 3:

And it was nice what I did. I said to Judy Wookie, our retirement assistant city manager, looking at overall, the people there having breakfast. People are getting a lot younger applying for jobs in Burbank and leaving a lot. We're going to other cities. I just found out that one of the fire inspectors that we had on our podcast has gone to Pasadena and yep, and they have four or five new inspectors. Is that the girl?

Speaker 1:

Yes, the one we just met at fire service day?

Speaker 2:

Yes, the one we like so much yes. We don't like anymore scared scared another one away.

Speaker 3:

Yep she, her husband's a fireman in Pasadena.

Speaker 1:

Okay but good, good, I've seen that coming.

Speaker 2:

probably then right now you know I put, I threw a tweet out. Today I saw an email put out that the city of Las Vegas, or Las Vegas City in Las Vegas, somewhere, when their suburbs is Asking, they're trying to get police officers on lateral laterals. You know for your cops somewhere and you want to become a cop there. They're offering them $30,000 signing bonuses, $5,000 relocation fees and if they're a military veteran, an extra five.

Speaker 1:

That's up to $40,000 the transfer to Las Vegas not not uncommon to Offer a signing, bonuses and stuff now just to attract people, because you have to differentiate yourself from all the other agencies. That is a lot.

Speaker 2:

How much are they gonna say that?

Speaker 1:

is a lot.

Speaker 2:

I'm not sitting so many to do all the background work. Yeah, all the man hours sit into an academy Doing the video to training on.

Speaker 1:

They probably the longer are actually making making out on they can put these people pretty much Right in the field and orientation. That's what.

Speaker 3:

Burbank fires done with their last round of fires. We took care of the fire department now.

Speaker 2:

The police department is doing their contract now. So let me tell you what if you don't take care of our cops, they're gonna go to Las Vegas or some other city and make a whole lot more money just just by walking in their door.

Speaker 3:

Right over our border to Glendale. What do you mean? Going yeah, so.

Speaker 1:

That's a real thing, it's getting real competitive now, because not this generation isn't in it as a calling anymore, as Tradition. It's a job now, so you have to be. They're competing now.

Speaker 3:

All these cities and departments have to be competitive just like any other industry now and most of the guys that are on the street Officers, police officers they're pretty young guys. I mean young man's business, you're right, because you promote, you go upstairs, you become a detective or whatever and you're not on the street anymore.

Speaker 1:

So they really well hard to keep a lot of departments hurting right now and you know because the you know the younger folks are in patrol because it really is a young person's business out there. But people get out of the out of patrol so quickly. Now with all the different special units and detectives and met teams and things like that, it's it's it's hard to maintain numbers in patrol. So our agencies now that are Making people from other divisions in the department do rotations in patrol. So you have detectives that might not fit in their old uniforms and now having to come out work patrol for six months Because they're so short-handed they can't keep up.

Speaker 3:

I remember, to seven, to East Olive. That was a tiny building, I remember it. You know they didn't, we didn't have that was the beginning of canine. We didn't have SWAT, we didn't have met, we didn't have SRT. Right back then it was SRT, but the permits are changing so rapidly back then a bear cat was a. Was an animal or a bear, cat without fur. Yeah, so departments are changing a lot and city employees, you know but we need to do what are we can to pay our.

Speaker 2:

I don't match other cities. Pay, give them more, keep them here. It's worth it in the long run.

Speaker 1:

Get my vote.

Speaker 2:

Um Thursday night, uh school district held their meeting and one of the things that they report out of their meeting was, uh, the graduation rates. This year, so at Burbank high they had 564 seniors and 528 graduated. 15 needed a fifth year and uh to graduate and 16 did not graduate and eight other seniors just dropped out. At boroughs there were 508 seniors, 492 graduated and two needed a fifth year. There were eight non graduates to drop down and a Monterey.

Speaker 3:

Wait a minute. I got to give a shout out for boroughs.

Speaker 1:

They beat Burbank high at something.

Speaker 3:

Exactly. That's all the motto, craig.

Speaker 2:

They also had less students too.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, but I'm at Monterey, so I was just saying I'm sorry to interrupt, but the, the, they say some needed a fifth year and then 16 or whatever. Does that mean that they didn't qualify for another year?

Speaker 2:

They don't have enough credits to graduate, they get some Fs and everything else. They send them to adult school for those courses and once they pass those courses and get the three points or five points or whatever the points, that's called the fifth year. They don't actually go to school at eight hour day, they only go to take those classes they needed to.

Speaker 1:

They just have to make up for it. But there are some that don't even do that.

Speaker 2:

And I and I, and also when you do going to fifth year, you cannot play sports, you cannot do anything extra curricular, you don't need the distraction. Because you only have eight semesters of eligibility in high school sports. So once four years is up, you've lost your eligibility.

Speaker 3:

Okay, you left off, sorry.

Speaker 2:

Monterey. Monterey had 91 seniors, 88 graduated and three needed a fifth year to graduate. There were zero non-graduates, but one did drop out. So I'm trying to figure out. They had, let's see, 91, 91 seniors, 88 graduated and three needed a fifth year. But they say one dropped out. That would have made 92. So somebody in the school districts needs to go to school.

Speaker 1:

None of them are good at math.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I guess you know you got to take your hat off to those kids at Monterey. I've been to that school, I've covered events at that school. They really they want to get that GED.

Speaker 2:

Well, you know, that's kind of it's last chance. Now they've got a couple other schools in the district. They've got the what do they call it? The place over on.

Speaker 3:

Santa Anita and San.

Speaker 2:

Fernando.

Speaker 1:

Which.

Speaker 2:

I actually worked a few times back in my school district days.

Speaker 3:

That is a rough, rough play.

Speaker 2:

That is where students use four letter words in front of their teachers. And what are you going to do about it? And you know they're doing or they can to keep these kids in school and you know my hats off to the staff there. And they do have an interesting turtle At least I did have a turtle back then who was roaming the grounds very, very large or the tortoise.

Speaker 3:

But I remember when they started their garden up there and they have a full culinary I mean these kids up there, their culinary a Kia went in there and fixed them a whole kitchen.

Speaker 1:

So is it more of a trade? No, no, no.

Speaker 2:

It's a last chance, charlie school it's, you know, it's for kids who've been violent, or yeah, it's like a guard, they have guard checks.

Speaker 1:

I'm familiar with the type of school. I've worked with them in the past. I just didn't know about Monterey specifically.

Speaker 2:

Kids can't come and go as they want, you know, I mean, it's a lockdown situation. But you know it's at least it was when I worked there.

Speaker 1:

Good for those who managed to graduate.

Speaker 3:

Exactly, I was just going to say hats off to all those kids that did get their diplomas and moving on to the world I'm going to turn the page.

Speaker 2:

Moving on to Friday, city manager report came out and somebody actually asked the city attorney's office if they could go back to doing small claims court again in Burbank. They used to years ago, but we're basically told that you know it's controlled by the LA County court system and they consolidated years ago to save money and so the nearest small claims courts are like in Van Nuys and Pasadena and Burbank. They don't see Burbank ever bringing small claims back, which is a shame because it's nice to have our own court here that we can actually have.

Speaker 1:

Rarely do you get anything back that's taken away.

Speaker 3:

Right, and they not only small claims, but they wanted um a night court or no, they um. When you get evicted, um get the word in the landlord tenant.

Speaker 2:

Yeah yeah, they eviction court or something. Yeah, okay, um, but again they said not in Burbank, but that we don't control that Burbank doesn't control. That's the court system in LA.

Speaker 1:

It's a county, LA County.

Speaker 2:

Yep, that's, that's Nobel County. Um, there was also exploring a bicycle pedestrian bridge from Burbank to basically were on to forced on drive over the LA River. But people in the ranch have a lot of concerns about basically un-CD characters using it from the LA side, coming to Burbank, robin House or something, and running back over that bridge.

Speaker 1:

Well, I totally see the point there, Because what lives on the other side of what where the bridge would be, what's there now?

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

You know 60 dilapidated. You know RVs and trap piles of trash and stuff. But my initial, my innocent question to this is who do? Who would this benefit?

Speaker 3:

Well, when I was on walk bike Burbank many years ago, there's a lot of trails over there. And how do you on a bike? Yeah, you can't bring your bike across the horses off of it. Well, you can't go on the horse bridge to go over. So what they were going to do with Bob Hope? They were going to build a bridge for a bike, just for bike, and walking Can't drive over it. But again, this was years ago, yeah.

Speaker 2:

And I understand because you know I don't know if people know this or not but a lot of our house home burglars occur up on the hill in Burbank and they're finding that people drive up Cabrini Drive park at the top, jump over the fence and walk a few you know 40 or 50 yards and they're in Burbank backyards and they're up there robbing houses and then they grab the stuff, they go down the hill and they jump over the fence and they're basically they're not even in Burbank, they're in LA now because Cabrini Drive is in LA. So I can see where that could happen on you know a bridge or from Forest on Drive. Well, they rob it, they run across Forest on it and that's it. How are the cops going to get over there? They have to go all the way around. They're gone by then.

Speaker 3:

And I don't think a lot of people understand Bob Hope Drive. Part of that is most of that park is in LA not Burbank.

Speaker 1:

We're talking opposite sides of town now, bob Hope, between Cabrini and Bob Hope. Well, put it the same situation, yeah, where some of it is in LA, some of it's in Burbank.

Speaker 3:

And they've been wanting to put this bike path in on Bob Hope Drive, going over, you know, over the river. But with what's going on, over the river now.

Speaker 1:

Who's wanting to do this? Who's pushing this?

Speaker 3:

The bike coalition. You know a lot of people that ride bikes.

Speaker 2:

It was just more of a you know. Hey, this is going and this is what we're hearing, and it was the city manager reports nothing.

Speaker 3:

Just information, just information.

Speaker 2:

You know what they're hearing. The weekend, the historical I'm sorry, the historical society had their uh.

Speaker 1:

Freudian, freudian, freudian, slip, as they call it.

Speaker 2:

He's a member and I remember I have a hard carry member, you do get hysterical. Yes, I do. I have a hard carry member, though, and I advise everybody to go out and get that $20 a year. You can afford that to keep her big system.

Speaker 1:

You missed your shot. You got yours at the, at the, at the event this year. With your donation, you also put in for your membership. Kudos to you.

Speaker 3:

You know how many people thanked us for that, while I was there Saturday covering it for the podcast that we did.

Speaker 2:

I'll tell anyone who listened to it.

Speaker 3:

Well, several of the members there.

Speaker 1:

Those are just unique listeners they listened to it several times.

Speaker 2:

Oh shit, that's.

Speaker 3:

But uh, it was a rather nice event. This was, I guess, one of three. They had a tea, they had the event, we did the barbecue. And today then there was a wine reception. They had I picked the wrong one they had champagne. They had, uh, caviar. No, I didn't see caviar. Caviar, Um sure.

Speaker 1:

That was the name of the band Chart chart chart, chart chart.

Speaker 3:

How do you pronounce?

Speaker 1:

this tooth Chart chart. Chart chart. Thank you, don't lose your chicken.

Speaker 3:

Don't lose your chicken. Well, yeah, that tooth doesn't. Let me say chart cutary and chart chart.

Speaker 2:

Define the chart cutary for me.

Speaker 3:

But oh, salami, cheeses, almonds, nuts, fruit.

Speaker 1:

They had two huge Amy sampling. It's a platter, a sampler platter.

Speaker 3:

Oh a sampler platter. I think some people make platters, but then afterwards.

Speaker 1:

Chart. Cutaries are friends term. If you're in Italy, it's salumi.

Speaker 3:

So biggie platter Not salami, not salami salumi.

Speaker 2:

Ah, the Italian version of chart cutary. It's not platter.

Speaker 1:

Platter puss Chart. Cutaries for the frang. You could tell who travels out of. I do. I am known to leave the bubble on occasion.

Speaker 3:

Yes, but then they had. They went upstairs and our good friend Don Baldessaroni, who is a president of the Historical Society, introduced a ton of kids and a ton of their board members. They had a dessert table with, oh my, all sorts of goodies. The eight kids wrote essays and tomorrow morning there will be an article in my Burbank from our Devon Herenda with pictures from yours truly of the event. We had some council members there. Anthony Portatino was there and made a presentation, so it was a rather nice event. You know, like she says in her article, or Don Baldessaroni says, for the kids that get to go and really know where Burbank started the airport days, the, you know, lockheed beam here.

Speaker 1:

And anybody in the Burbank or Burbank area you know one of these great events that they have. There is reason enough to go check out the Historical Society. It's a fantastic venue. Just go during regular hours. You'll spend hours just walking around learning about every weekend. You'll have all the history.

Speaker 2:

You'll have an hysterical time with the Historical Society.

Speaker 1:

A hysterical time, especially if you get lost in the building.

Speaker 2:

That's easy to do. Actually, it has a two story building.

Speaker 1:

Two story you would never know what was upstairs if you didn't venture up there. But there's an upstairs.

Speaker 3:

It's really neat, so it was a rather, rather nice event. Thank you to Mary Jane Strickland, who back in 1973, 50 years ago, thought about starting a museum and so forth.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. Well, that's it for the week that was. We're going to pause for a quick commercial break and we'll be back with a week that will be.

Speaker 1:

How would you like your business advertised in this very spot? My Burbank Talks is looking for local businesses interested in a 30 second spot to appear in our podcasts. If you're interested, please email advertising at myburbankcom and we'll be glad to discuss all the exciting possibilities with you. Now back to our podcast.

Speaker 2:

And we're back the week that was week that will be.

Speaker 1:

I'm challenging our advertising department to put an ad in there sometime so I don't have to hear my voice in the middle of the show all the time.

Speaker 3:

You know it's funny. This week I did talk to two people.

Speaker 2:

You talked- to two people. You talked to a lot more than that At the same time.

Speaker 3:

But I talked to them about that spot so we might have somebody.

Speaker 1:

Well, well, any list. Anybody listening out there, Just understand. If you're listening to the podcast and you hear my voice in that ad right there, you know it's vacant and that's your chance to jump in on that and get a 30 second spot in the middle of this very podcast.

Speaker 2:

Well, make sure here, along with Craig Julian Ross Benson, for our second segment here. I was going to start off with talking about the strike today, providence St Joseph Medical Center, but Ross already jumped on that earlier out of order on the script.

Speaker 1:

So he was out of order.

Speaker 3:

Now that I see it says I couldn't figure out who was out striking the service employees international union why.

Speaker 2:

Why do I send this to you? Why do you bother? Why do we sit down and talk about?

Speaker 3:

this before and I didn't see this.

Speaker 1:

It's news to him. It's like reading the paper for the first time.

Speaker 2:

Well, we'll just gloss right over that. You guys are in charge.

Speaker 3:

You're in charge, you guys, I must be when I took my nap all day For that damn helicopter helicopter the helicopter that for those of you who are flying during the day, when normal people are.

Speaker 2:

How did it fly when people are trying to sleep in the middle of the?

Speaker 1:

day. To be clear, Ross, he works the night shift.

Speaker 2:

Yes, he does. He's the night owl. At least he's after the night shift. I was up all night.

Speaker 3:

I watched the strikers at 4 am getting ready to go pick at St Joe's. I thought it was dark it was, and then when the sun comes up, I go to bed.

Speaker 1:

So you're like a vampire? Oh, I am.

Speaker 2:

You know what was dark? The planning commission. They did not meet again today. They were dark. How are we building Good?

Speaker 3:

segue, good segue. And we're building with no planning.

Speaker 2:

Well, we have no plan. There's nothing to plan anymore, we're just going to. It's all SB 35 projects. Now they have no control.

Speaker 3:

What Did you notice? Empire is closed West of Boinevista getting the Department of Water Power redoing.

Speaker 2:

How would I notice that?

Speaker 3:

Because we ran.

Speaker 1:

Did we not run? You don't read MyBurbankcom.

Speaker 2:

You know what we got? Run, no, we don't run. I don't run at all, in fact, I barely walk.

Speaker 1:

I don't run at all. I don't run at all.

Speaker 3:

Oh, I thought we put a notice up about Empire being closed through traffic.

Speaker 2:

Not. The only output was San Fernando being closed.

Speaker 1:

Oh, okay, Well consider yourself advised, Advised I guess, because I drive that every week.

Speaker 2:

Well, maybe you want to share that with people next time you see it.

Speaker 3:

I thought they sent it out and I thought we ran it. I don't read every article in my life. Anyway, back to the live show. Yes, Empire is closed. West of Boinevista for water and power installing new water lines, water mains and sewer for that SB35 project.

Speaker 2:

We did run saying about that. Yeah, we did run saying about that. We just didn't say when it was going to happen, but we did say Well they're happening currently.

Speaker 1:

Okay, currently.

Speaker 2:

Well, good, we need that stuff. We don't be like LA and have 125 year old pipes that keep exploding all over the place.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, we don't wait for that to happen, right?

Speaker 2:

Yes, Especially when you have how many new units going Right Well besides the planning commission doing not not plan I guess they planned to be dark, so they they were dark and City Council meeting on tomorrow, Um, they're going to approve A let's see Do? I don't know if I put it on the no, I did not One of the things that's not on here which just came out today. They did a special addendum to the breaking news. Yes, we have. I wasn't going to ask why was they? have a council agenda amended because they have now put on the closed session. Uh, mr Nick Gutierrez is versus the city of Burbank and are going to talk about the case, which means something has come up and they have to notify the public. So I had to send out a special notice because it's only 24 hours notice. They amended the agenda, so something has come up with the mysterious Nick Gutierrez or Nicholas Gutierrez against the city of Burbank to make council district. Remember. Now, this is the one, one person that nobody's ever heard of, nobody knows about, who's never come forward. Nobody seen in person that we know of and wants Burbank to change your entire election system. So he feels, because he has felt disenfranchised. And please tell me who this guy is. Tell me if he's either voted in an election before.

Speaker 1:

Is anybody out there? Know him.

Speaker 2:

I think the user name that was very generic, but you know my user name, joe Smith, you know. I mean I just I'm sorry, you know they said the council me so unusual to have a guy file this kind of a lawsuit and not want to be involved in the process of how to fix the situation. I'm telling you right now it's a shake. So hopefully, whatever our city attorneys will come up with the telecounsel on Tuesday and we won't find out because everything goes on. I don't think I don't think anything's ever been reported out during the council meeting goes on in closed session and yeah, I just the stand line. Nothing was reportable.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, well, no, yeah, he uses line no. No decisions were made.

Speaker 2:

No action were taken by the council that was reportable.

Speaker 3:

That's it.

Speaker 2:

That's what he says. I was always push a button on our board that has that come out every time, don't we have it and we like something flushing or so we like, said the attorney, he's a good guy. Joe McDougal is a good guy, we like him, but it's just frustrating that they are. They keep you know and I'll tell you when they settle a lawsuit they should tell us a lawsuit got settled.

Speaker 3:

You would have liked Joe McDougal. On Thursday he was serving the bacon.

Speaker 1:

Who's Joe McDougal? Our city attorney with the listeners, for the listeners name in a while.

Speaker 2:

So I said before, I see Joe McDougals and they had department heads serving food.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, the city employees. He was serving the bacon and I got a good picture him.

Speaker 2:

There's a joke there.

Speaker 1:

There's like three jokes I'm staying away from all the do we have the? Do we do the explicit thing on YouTube?

Speaker 2:

You know, the only thing I got, the only I got about the bacon is I heard that at dinner tonight because that's the big one it was. That's where the bacon comes from. Um, ok, um, so that's on the closed session. We won't know what happens, we don't know why it's on closed session. It's sad because it's only discussing our future in the city, but it's. It's what a mess, what, what? Just a stupid mess. We'll find out anyhow. Um, they're going to approve an agreement with play power. Um, the Ralfway Park toddler replacement project. So if you're new, if you like to use a wrote the Ralfway toddler, they're going to have new equipment in there and they're going to redo it.

Speaker 1:

So play power is also known as miracle recreation. So they do Playgrounds. Yeah, recreational park.

Speaker 3:

I don't think everybody remembers when we had the large storms, a huge, huge, huge tree, huge, huge like a ut totally collapse on the playground equipment and it's still sitting there, unusable, and tape all around it. You know it's closed off.

Speaker 1:

It's like old versus new. It's like our generation. We played in trees, we climbed trees. Now the trees are tree, took out their jungle gym.

Speaker 3:

Right.

Speaker 1:

So generation X the wind.

Speaker 3:

So if you're frequent to Ralfway Park, what was it called before?

Speaker 2:

Northwest.

Speaker 3:

The baseball guy would have known that.

Speaker 2:

And what was it before Northwest Park? Oh geez.

Speaker 3:

A driving range? Yes, it was.

Speaker 2:

Actually a three par.

Speaker 1:

Oh, did it have a name?

Speaker 2:

No, it's just called. It's the three par on victory. Didn't give things names but it didn't need to because it was the only one.

Speaker 3:

Um one of a kind Now. The next one is very well. I can't wait to hear.

Speaker 2:

I think it's yeah.

Speaker 3:

I think it's gonna be a boy. I'm getting comfortable in my chair for this one.

Speaker 2:

Two or three years ago the city council started talking about why don't we start charging for parking in Burbank, having parking meters? And they decided, ok, for a trial place, let's try the metric link lot. Well, three years later, there's no parking meters at the metric lot. They've just kind of said, oh well, we're not doing that now. Now they're coming back and saying now, let's put parking meters downtown Burbank, on San Fernando which is legendary for not charging for parking. Right.

Speaker 3:

But if you recall, they reported out in their report the reason they did not put parking it wasn't going to be meters, it's going to be a station.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, but you got to pay for parking Right. Ok, the reason they did that parking meters to make it easier for people to visualize but they're not.

Speaker 3:

They have not done that because people are not using Metro link to go downtown.

Speaker 2:

Well, the pandemic is ending, and guess what? People are going to start going back downtown again.

Speaker 3:

That's why they are.

Speaker 2:

So why not still put them there? But anyhow, so they want to do downtown Burbank, on San Fernando, between Olive and Magnolia and on Orange Grove and the sides and the parking structures it does include the parking structure. No, it did not say the parking structure. They had a map and the parking structures were not in that map.

Speaker 1:

I did hear the elevators will be coin operated though. Yes, bring change. Just kidding, just kidding.

Speaker 2:

And if you get stuck in the elevator, whatever money you ran out of dimes or something I don't know. Same day you get the jackpot, you know.

Speaker 3:

Well, you know the city has done studies and I really have. I get it when they the reason you put in parking meters. A lot of people are going to are saying Burbank's never done that, but you got to maintain these parking lots and so forth.

Speaker 2:

OK, let's talk about that. I agree 100 percent. I mean that's all. But here's the problem. Ok, so it's going to cost about three hundred twenty five thousand dollars to procure and install the necessary infrastructure, as well as annually cost up to five hundred thousand a year to pay for a parking operator to manage the program and provide parking enforcement. Now here's the rub.

Speaker 1:

It's going to take two years to make any money.

Speaker 2:

Staff in now staff. Anticipates annual revenue for the program will be approximately five hundred thousand per year.

Speaker 1:

So it'll take two years for us to for the city to get in the red.

Speaker 2:

No, because it costs five hundred thousand a year to operate the program and are going to make back five hundred thousand dollars.

Speaker 1:

But they initially have to pay three hundred twenty five thousand right for the infrastructure, so that rounded up to a million. It's going to take two years before the city's making anything.

Speaker 2:

But they say it's going to take five hundred thousand every year to pay the parking people and that's the money that's coming in every year. It's going to break even every year.

Speaker 1:

After the first two no, every year.

Speaker 2:

If you, if every year you pay five hundred thousand dollars out and every year you're getting five hundred thousand dollars back, there's no profit Right, but the right, but the first year we're paying eight hundred twenty five thousand, and we'll make five hundred thousand that year.

Speaker 1:

Ok, so it'll cost us. Ok, so we're going to make the second year before we start making the second year. Five hundred.

Speaker 2:

Now we should be back the second year.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but we're still paying off the three twenty five part. This isn't the time to do math, but yeah, I don't understand.

Speaker 2:

We're going to make exactly what we pay every year.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, after we pay.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so the initial we're actually we're actually going to lose three hundred twenty five thousand over the on the project.

Speaker 3:

I don't think so.

Speaker 2:

I'm, I'm, I just have another commercial.

Speaker 1:

We'll talk about the math.

Speaker 2:

I copy and paste it in report. So I'm telling you right now Because I remember.

Speaker 1:

It doesn't. It doesn't mention that I was just doing some superfluous addition.

Speaker 3:

But the the goal here is we're going to ask for to Magnolia Park the same thing. It gets people to move their cars. Your employees are lazy asses that park in front of where they work and walk ten feet OK, and when you got to pay, the customer has to walk six blocks.

Speaker 2:

I'm. All I'm saying is there's no income to the city coming in off this thing.

Speaker 3:

I believe it pays for itself yeah no, you're right, it pays for itself.

Speaker 2:

That's it.

Speaker 3:

Right In the long run Right. So what's the?

Speaker 1:

point Right.

Speaker 2:

If it yeah, the point is how are we going to maintain parking structures?

Speaker 1:

How's it going to help if we're making money coming in?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I agree, that's my point, yeah.

Speaker 1:

So, and if it includes the parking structure.

Speaker 2:

I won't be going downtown and I got to the truth. Why five, five hundred thousand dollars to pay somebody to administer the program Are you kidding me?

Speaker 1:

And do the and do the enforcement for one contract company doing.

Speaker 2:

We're going to talk about last right. Ok, so last is our parking people. I used to. They want to hire more people. Right, our parking, the parking people you said earlier right, they're looking for boys. So this is probably want to hire more people is to do this, but I just can't imagine taking five hundred thousand dollars to run this program. You know we're going to pay the guy in charge a half a million dollar or two hundred thousand dollars and a hundred thousand dollars for the employee.

Speaker 1:

If there's no, if we just the city is just going to break even on this on an annual basis, what's the point? What's the benefit?

Speaker 2:

Thank you, thank you.

Speaker 1:

And then we're going to have two different companies contracted to do parking enforcement in the city and then we're going to have to do the general parking enforcement and then, whenever contractor this is to, do that.

Speaker 3:

The meter is going to do like the lot, yeah, the Metro lot and the the certain area.

Speaker 2:

We're not doing the Metro lot now. I was just going to downtown Burbank.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think we agree. We just we're not seeing a benefit to the city.

Speaker 2:

That's exactly what I'm. I'm all because I agree. Like what Ross says, People park their cars there all day long and people who want to come into their stores. Now you know I'm not going there. There's nowhere to park.

Speaker 1:

Now they have to get like employee permits or something that, so they don't have to pay the meters, or how does that work? It's all sounds like a lot more work, a lot more infrastructure you know that doesn't benefit anybody.

Speaker 3:

A lot of people don't realize there's lots all over the city that are city owned, that you can pay.

Speaker 2:

And they ran out of space and we talked about that.

Speaker 3:

the courthouse a few weeks ago over on Magnolia, next to the pet store C&C I think it is. That's a paid lot which portos pays for spots for their employees.

Speaker 2:

Well, I say I, I understand the philosophy behind this, I understand the benefits that could occur, but I don't see the benefits on paper. Unless we were wrote this report out, didn't write it in a way that's, that's you know, because all it means is OK, they put now, they put parking meters on on Magnolia. Is it going to cost? You know they're going to make 200,000 a year and have to pay 200,000 years to make it work. I mean it just doesn't. It doesn't make sense to me overall. That I think the C&A is probably making hand over foot money on their parking meter system and Burbank we could best reduce break even Doesn't make any sense to me.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, well, moving on, that's something that I will give you, David Chris keys phone number. Well, I'm going to call.

Speaker 2:

I'm going to listen to the report. I'm going to listen with the key on. All four council members are one. Don't want to say you know there are questions.

Speaker 1:

Moving along right. Moving right along discussion on possible construction measures to reduce potential construction impacts, ocustrian uses and equines. That's horses to you and me.

Speaker 3:

With this construction that's going on on Mariposa, the Pickwick project. That's where the horse people are a little worried. Drop trucks moving in and out, trucks moving sand and dirt the common when there's construction you know the horses or whatever it is.

Speaker 2:

They're also talking about me closing down some of the trails and bridges during the construction too. I'm sure the people there will be very upset about that. They want to do that also, so that's something.

Speaker 3:

It's gonna be. They want to do, they want to, they want to limit the footprint.

Speaker 1:

The problem disruption yes For a project they didn't want in the first place, and now, on Wednesday, craig is gonna go and attend the senior board at Jocelyn you are Craig. No, no, he's not somebody told me I'm not an assignment, you're on.

Speaker 3:

Jocelyn duty.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, well, off to Jocelyn, you go.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's about nutrition. I look at me. What do I know about nutrition? Absolutely nothing. And then we go into Thursday that meeting at Wednesday is at 1 pm of the Jocelyn Center. There's the the infrastructure board to schedule me to 6 pm. So far as of On the weekend here there are agenda has not been posted but yeah, it's about infrastructure and probably Really important and you'll be bored. They, yeah, but they actually will discuss something compared to the police commission.

Speaker 1:

That's at the community services building. Is it always the same place? Always the same place, always at the same place?

Speaker 2:

I'll in bat time same bat channel right, I Know that.

Speaker 1:

I remember that, yeah good 60s television Big big, well, friday big football game.

Speaker 2:

Friday is the big football game and it's a very interesting big and I thought we just we spent a little time Because it's sad that once again, no pool. Yeah, you can't make the eight balls in the corner pocket. No, I think it's sad once again that our generations now Don't get to do the things that we got to do when we were younger too dangerous. You had Burbank boroughs week back then, and every day during the week there'd be an event, and when it might be the, the bedraces of the mattress races that races down San Francisco. Bedraces of the mattress races that races down San Fernando. I'm not really. They throw the head coach on a bed and the lineman from each team would could possibly go wrong.

Speaker 1:

He was wearing a football helmet and he was on a mattress.

Speaker 2:

Burbank versus boroughs and all that. We used to have the eating content. I think it was at Santoros used to sponsor the eating contest. One day I know it's another day where players from both schools would go to the. The cheerleaders would go to the middle schools or the back of the junior highs and have rallies and stuff. The day of the game the Burbank high marching band would march from Burbank high Down to Memorial Stadium, down Glen Oaks, down Olive.

Speaker 3:

No, magnolia.

Speaker 2:

Oh my god, I'm sorry, magnolia.

Speaker 3:

Did it for several years with my kid. Yeah he carried a tuba and now once again, they take a bus.

Speaker 1:

Well, next to drums.

Speaker 2:

I was just told by a coach friend of mine. But now they've made it so every team in Burbank or every activity, must pay 100% of their own buses. There is no money for the district for buses for anybody.

Speaker 3:

You know what I say to that? The wheels on the bus go around in or the wheels have come off.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because you know you gotta pay for $300,000 for new superintendents.

Speaker 3:

So that's now, okay, I got a question. Then your Burbank bus it's, it's empty. Why don't they transport the band down? Because it's a little fit in it.

Speaker 1:

There were two people on that bus tonight that went by us twice the same two people.

Speaker 2:

Three bus? Yeah, the same thing.

Speaker 1:

two people run it. Was that including the driver or no? No, okay.

Speaker 2:

We saw a song. What 40 minutes, 50 minutes? Three buses go by on Riverside Drive. Why I just In between the buses went by.

Speaker 1:

Metro buses, use them.

Speaker 2:

use them for something I mean there's six or seven buses going by in between six and seven o'clock tonight, but nobody anything that said Burbank on the side of it was empty.

Speaker 1:

Well, get back to the big game, you know, I will say big game.

Speaker 3:

You know, many years ago, back about 50 years ago, I can say that I started a something at Burroughs.

Speaker 2:

That's a lot of trouble throwing red dye in the Burbank, I know.

Speaker 3:

I would go out to Costa D Cadillac and I would get Four convertibles from them. They would lend them to us and we rode the Queens around the football field. We can't do any more now because we spent ten million dollars on a ten million dollars on a field that we can't put in when they couldn't get cars Cadillac with convertibles anymore, they started getting fire trucks and Water and power trucks and they put the kids up on there and they can't do that anymore because you can't drive anything on that field. But I look back to my years. I have pictures me dressed in a nice little tuxedo I had to say that properly and I got to drive around the Queens and the Queens and I started that back in class 73 and 74 and they did that for many years and that was a big thing. Oh yeah, I remember when they put extra stands On both ends of the football they can have a ten thousand capacity and now Forget it.

Speaker 2:

Well now, now no one doesn't even sell out anymore. Number two is that, even if it were, they wouldn't put any more Temporary stands up anymore. They, in fact. I was told I saw an email today by the burrows principle that they're only gonna allow 500 of the students of burrows to use their ASB cards. Now I say well, you buy an ASB card, you get to go to games for free.

Speaker 3:

Well, not necessarily, because this game is all a lot different, but I with you saying that but you know, bros is playing for a league title on Friday night right and it doesn't change. Burles is a visitor side that is a much smaller stand right and that's why they're limiting and they've already said on the, also the media email, they're gonna be using it.

Speaker 2:

There's a section on the main stands.

Speaker 3:

I always do. You have been to a football game?

Speaker 2:

I'm telling you, but they've never put a limit on this, on the amount of kids who get a pass before well.

Speaker 3:

It's unfortunate they don't even fill large stands anymore. Yeah, the Burbank Burrows game. It's really sad, that's true.

Speaker 2:

so my whole point is was it's too bad. They don't have the activities they used to have to really bring up Spirit and to give a tradition. Traditions gone. It's just the Burbank Burrows game now and that's. That's basically it. It's too bad. There were a lot of traditions over the years that our kids nowadays don't get to experience.

Speaker 3:

You know, I'm very true and very sad.

Speaker 1:

Big weekend, big weekend coming up next weekend and somebody's looking for volunteers.

Speaker 2:

We got a lot of people who's looking for volunteers and they all want to do them, to do the same thing at the same time.

Speaker 3:

They want to dig we'll start.

Speaker 2:

We'll start off with the library. They're having a dig event and of course we never did fend out with if dig is an acrimon for something or not.

Speaker 3:

We looked into it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah it's just the act of digging and you're supposed to yell it because it's in all caps.

Speaker 2:

But they use a. Yeah, they use all caps. We figured it stood for something, but I guess not so. So that's a Saturday morning, asking where people come volunteer at the Central Library from 8 to 10 am.

Speaker 3:

That's the 28th Saturday, the 20th, they're not gonna be doing any digging in the library.

Speaker 2:

No, around it.

Speaker 3:

There's a park and I forget the name of that park outside of the main central library.

Speaker 2:

That's one of the homeless people who live in that parking.

Speaker 3:

They don't live there anymore, but they have. There's a time capsule in there, there's a couple of them in there and all around there they're.

Speaker 2:

They want people to what's gonna happen, those time capsules, when they Destroy that library and Rebuild it across the street probably the same thing that happened to the other time capsules.

Speaker 3:

They'll open it up, yeah, but why did it's play of the stuff out?

Speaker 2:

Why did they open the last one up? They forgot all about it and our good friend the gila departed. Stan Lynch, who was there when they planted it, 50 years before that said what about the time capsule? You know what time capsule? All the one that's embedded inside the Magnolia Bridge on behind the plaque? Really, yes, take a look. Oh, there's a time capsule there though they stand.

Speaker 3:

Rest in peace. He was the lucky one to Take a chisel and a hammer and how get that thing out?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely a lot of historical stuff in there. Now I hope, I hope somebody in the secret actually remember about the Time capsules that are buried up there at the library.

Speaker 3:

Oh, the ones up there above ground.

Speaker 2:

Okay, are they? Yes, I still probably don't know about them.

Speaker 1:

Put a post it on the outside right remember.

Speaker 2:

So they need volunteers to help tidy up around the park bring your trial travel.

Speaker 1:

You call it a travel and also our name trial.

Speaker 3:

like with this chick live, it's hard to say trial, trial If you're, if you're smaller small shovel.

Speaker 1:

All right, sorry, we'll behave.

Speaker 2:

All right, you're. If you're at a Don't want to go help out at the library, then they want you to go help out at the Macambridge Veterans Memorial, and that's also from 8 to 10 am. Too bad they didn't pick a different weekend to move quick or Do something like that. So they're at their library from 8 to 10. At the memorial, they want people to help you get the memorial ready for Veterans Day, which is, of course, november 11th.

Speaker 3:

You know that's a Saturday.

Speaker 2:

That's gonna piss off a lot of said a lot of city people who have to now come on a Day off.

Speaker 3:

I wonder if they can do it on Saturday or on Friday.

Speaker 2:

You know what a lot to the people who died that were still celebrating. I don't think they took weekends off. Oh, also, on Saturday there is a drug take back day.

Speaker 1:

So, for all the drugs and needles you find while you're digging around in the parks, you can bring them here.

Speaker 2:

That's at the police department from 10 am to 2 pm. So anything you're unwanted, unused or expired prescription medication you can bring for a safe disposal.

Speaker 1:

Now noted, it's the beer parking lot. Don't bring them into the lobby of the police or fire station it's the back parking lot.

Speaker 3:

I've covered that event for several years. They haven't worked out. They give you there's literally cones. You don't need to get out of your car. You drive up, you pop your trunk. They will have a cadet take whatever. They don't care what it is, they will take and weigh it and take care of it.

Speaker 1:

It does say here no illicit drugs or needles. They're asking, so yeah they don't. So basically prescription medication.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, they don't want illegal drugs, they want their prescription old prescription medication. You got a couple of bottles here in your cabinet.

Speaker 1:

Instead of flushing them down the toilet or throwing them away, bring them here and they'll dispose of them, and that includes vitamins, anything that you know how many I got.

Speaker 3:

I missed the last two and on my countertop I got all sorts of we know where you're gonna be.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

The rear parking lot of the police station.

Speaker 3:

I've been there before.

Speaker 2:

Well, and McCambridge Park is holding the Little Pumpkins Tot Party From 10, 11, 30 am. Did you say Tot Party or Tot Dirty? Not a pot party, not a pot party, tot party, tot party From kids two to five. This too.

Speaker 3:

I'll tell you.

Speaker 2:

I can't say nothing. The cost is $5. So if you want to go and participate, you can pay the city $5.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, was that per kid or Per kid For kids two to five For kids.

Speaker 3:

Can you get rid of your kids too?

Speaker 2:

That's a different giveaway on a different day. What's happened over? They're gonna be at the Halloween skate fest at Valley Skate Park from five to eight thirty.

Speaker 3:

And what did that girlie?

Speaker 2:

ask tonight. This is actually interesting because they're gonna charge you $5 for the Tot Party, but they're gonna have a big raffles and food and everything else at the skate park for free, so I don't know why they didn't have to charge a little kid $5. All about the donors and sponsors.

Speaker 3:

I will tell you I covered that event more than once. They are very lucky with some of these skateboard companies.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 3:

Mr Grisafo has been in charge of it and he gets Mr Grisafo was up the city four years ago.

Speaker 1:

And there are no strangers.

Speaker 3:

He still goes back to the skate parks every year he does, yes, he does, and he's out there.

Speaker 2:

We had to be a special guest on our podcast Wednesday, so we'll talk to him about that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, no, he puts on. He knows Every kid. He gets out there and goes on boards with him.

Speaker 2:

So no, no, he does not get on. You don't know what the way.

Speaker 1:

We don't want, not like the planning board Not like get on a skateboard.

Speaker 2:

That would never happen.

Speaker 3:

Last time I saw Mike, he had orange hair. He's lucky he has hair.

Speaker 2:

He had orange hair Well the event a while the event at the skate park has had competitions, raffles and food open all no prior registration.

Speaker 3:

They do some good cooking out there.

Speaker 2:

No prior registration. And for those who don't know, the skate park is on Klybourne and right by Edison, not at the corner, because he have the park right there the baseball field.

Speaker 3:

Why is it then called Klybourne Park?

Speaker 2:

Because it's called the Valley Skate Park. Why.

Speaker 3:

Because it's on Valley or it's in the Valley. It's in the Valley, on the Valley, in the Valley, on the big Valley. The Valley is the Eastern street.

Speaker 2:

But that park's not on Valley.

Speaker 1:

You're about to break out into song. The skate park is not on Valley, it's a show tune, ross. The skate park's on Klybourne.

Speaker 3:

Wait, but the cross street is Valley.

Speaker 2:

No, the parallel street's Valley, cross streets, klybourne, I mean Edison.

Speaker 1:

So the dumpster, dumpster's on Valley, the front door's on Klybourne. Anyhow, that's how that works.

Speaker 2:

It's right next to the baseball field there.

Speaker 1:

Sometimes people can know too much about the city.

Speaker 3:

I was so once told don't drive down Valley when I had a old cutlass and I had so much crap in the trunk Looked like a low rider car and a police officer said this street is not the street you wanna be driving down in that car. Oh, that was also Elmwood, dave.

Speaker 1:

Ferrand.

Speaker 3:

Oh yes, an old Elmwood boy, elmwood. Very well, what else is happening, dr Letta-ta?

Speaker 2:

The Burbank Community Band is gonna put on a show at 7 pm at the first Christian church at 221 South 6th Street called Harmony of Halloween. So that's another event Saturday.

Speaker 3:

I was told they're playing some songs from Phantom of the Opera and some other spooky songs.

Speaker 2:

And then Ross has a note here saying other events. All were Burbank. Ross, what do you got for the other events All over?

Speaker 3:

There are more. I don't know why, but this year it feels like there are probably 100 houses that are decorated. People that have not been working at the studios have had plenty of time. They've been very busy at home Getting their yards ready, and I'll tell you.

Speaker 2:

Those are events.

Speaker 1:

This is just the drive-around look at how the city put out their list you got a lot of set decorators and who are looking for stuff to keep them busy. Exactly, and do it up.

Speaker 3:

If you have young ones who's around, it'll take you a couple hours to get around. You can divide the city up. You know the hill or the valley.

Speaker 1:

You got tons of places and I recommend in these neighborhoods, get out and walk the neighborhood on the sidewalks. Please don't go creeping down the street with your headlights off and all that Looking at the lights, because then you're looking for the pedestrians and the kids running across the dark street Even during the day. So you have every year.

Speaker 3:

Mr Craig Dirling, didn't you find a house during the daylight? That looked just as good.

Speaker 1:

Yeah yeah. There's one in the neighborhood here that's very well known for its holiday decorations and it's quite impressive during the day, and you got the whole thing to yourself. You go there at night. You're tripping over the broken sidewalk Dogs. I didn't know there were that many dogs in the Tuluk Lake Burbank area, but they're all out there at night Dog barking. That's Dodger at the door trying to get through here.

Speaker 3:

I was gonna say did you record Dodger?

Speaker 1:

No, that sounds just like Dodger God it did.

Speaker 2:

That's Dodger the dog.

Speaker 1:

No, but please be careful. Driving around looking at the lights. Halloween, you see it a lot at Christmas People blacked out driving around at night looking, and they're all looking like this.

Speaker 2:

They're all looking like that it's hard for people who are looking at their cellphones across the street to know you're coming if you don't have your headlights on.

Speaker 1:

Right, pedestrian's not paying attention and driver's not paying attention. It's a very dangerous combination.

Speaker 2:

Because one car hits one pedestrian and it's Ah, lights out, literally. Okay, what are we up to? That leaves us to the one. And guess what? Nobody in the studio knows what it's about. We never know. He wouldn't write it down, so we have no idea. But it's that time to show that. Yes, if you stayed here for the first. This is your reward hour and 15 minutes of this show. You now get to hear it, and of course, we're talking about Ross's rant. Ross's rant.

Speaker 1:

Ross's rant. I got a question.

Speaker 3:

Okay, these memorials that I talked about, that are getting set up when people have gotten killed accidentally. You know, there's one of Victory and Magnolia. Still there's one now Buena Vista, in Verdugo. There's another one, oh, the one where the kids got killed up on Glen Oaks. Who maintains or who clears out those candles? You know the flowers are? You know, god forbid we have an officer or fireman get killed. Those memorials get so big. Does the city have a date? How long those flowers will stick around? Or?

Speaker 2:

who clears them Not to. I mean, you're absolutely right. Now I know at the Vietnam War Memorial in Washington DC they've actually have people who, I guess at the end of the day or the week I'm not sure of the time period but walk around and respectfully take everything that's been left at the memorial, catalog it and actually store it somewhere. They don't throw it away.

Speaker 1:

There's an actual museum of things that have been left behind at the memorial.

Speaker 2:

So I mean, that's Now. I don't know what the policy is in Burr because, you're right, there are a couple of memorials that have been. Do we need to be? I know, when an officer dies, sometimes on a freeway or something, they put a sign up on the freeway or something in an area saying a memorial pass, wage or something.

Speaker 3:

Well, the three kids that lost their tragic life. They've dedicated and painted that with their lichens or facials. And there are always new candles and flowers there, but these other ones? I go by Victoria Magnolia every day and that girl, young girl, died a month ago now. And somebody keeps bringing fresh flowers. I understand, but how long do we allow that to go on? And who maintains that and who cleans?

Speaker 1:

it? Yeah, you really do. And who's gonna wanna answer that question?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was like you wanna be the person that tells them no more. I mean that's, but it's stuff that I have.

Speaker 3:

People ask me what happened there, and I understand that's a reason some of these memorials, but maybe the city, maybe they have a policy. If they don't have a policy on colors of lights at City Hall, I can guarantee they don't, because years ago they never did this. How many times have we? This is something new, craig you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, last 10 years.

Speaker 1:

Not to equate, these are totally different scenarios, but the thing that leapt to mind for the purpose of discussion was yard sale signs. Right, everybody staples them up all over the neighborhood.

Speaker 3:

They never take them down, if you ever turn up to a telephone pole, a wooden pole, and look how many staples?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I used to work for a city where, at night, one of our assignments was to go around and take them all down, because there was an ordinance against having them up. Isn't that Bob Cramer's job?

Speaker 3:

He used to, well, he used to be, he used to do that, but you know, and I just noticed that and I feel horrible for these people that have gotten killed. You know these are accidents and I understand the point of having a living memorial for a week or until they're buried, but do we have a policy or how long are we gonna let it go? And the things that are there? Maybe the city should collect them and tell the family what would you like to do with them? Yes, give it to them.

Speaker 2:

It's a very sensitive subject and there's not an easy answer, but something has to be.

Speaker 3:

It's a rant that I just you know. I noticed it every week and I see stuffed animals and new things coming up at these different ones. How long do we let it go? And you know.

Speaker 1:

It's not so much a rant, as it is just an observation Opposer. Yeah, tough question.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's a question that should be asked, though, because after a while and like I said, people after a while drive by there and they don't know what happened here you know.

Speaker 3:

Another one is Veterans Day or Memorial Day, when they put the flowers at the memorial at McCambridge. How long do they leave those roses sit there? Until they're dead and fallen apart?

Speaker 2:

I noticed that in the Hamson Cemetery you know they go to, you know there's actually the crews at cemeteries will go around and collect dead firewood.

Speaker 3:

They also collect items and they say it was just Makes you think. You know we're only here so long and I know these memorials are very touching to some people and they're touching to me too, but how long do we leave them there?

Speaker 2:

That's a good question.

Speaker 1:

How do we do it? We need a survey. We need to post a survey. Can we do that? Can we post a survey? Get people's thoughts on that.

Speaker 2:

We can put a survey on Twitter and see what people have to say about it.

Speaker 3:

So that was the week, that was, and the week will be for October 23rd, and I'll tell you, when we sat down to shoot the Go over the show notes, half the stuff wasn't on. It never is, because we had a whole week to put stuff in here.

Speaker 2:

One of our people forgets to write anything down and You're lucky, I remembered my tooth tonight, yeah.

Speaker 1:

I'll give you a hint it's one of the three of us and it's not me.

Speaker 2:

And I'm the guy who writes the original one up, so that leaves one. I'll tell you what I never forget to do. It is get to the pregame restaurant on time.

Speaker 3:

I did pretty good tonight, didn't I? Yeah, you were actually you did, I was sitting two minutes late.

Speaker 1:

No one's keeping score.

Speaker 3:

How was I last week?

Speaker 1:

I think he was early I was in here at all last week, so I don't even get any points, I think, for a free meal. Huh, not even for a free meal.

Speaker 3:

Well on your special assignment, be careful return safe, please, because we have stuff to do in a week or two.

Speaker 2:

Where are you flying to?

Speaker 1:

It's a special top secret, top secret. Okay, let's do it. Post a survey See where they already think I'm going.

Speaker 2:

I don't think I'd make any care of you.

Speaker 1:

It's work-related, it's not even for funds.

Speaker 2:

I wasn't gonna say anything.

Speaker 1:

Now we're tropical.

Speaker 2:

Just wondering what city you're happened to be.

Speaker 1:

It sounds like New Orleans, but you know, it's funny that you Rhymes with New Orleans.

Speaker 3:

You posted a picture of New Orleans. You posted a picture of the other day of your new booties.

Speaker 1:

Of my booty no, that would be against policy Of your booties, my new boots. That's for the big trip next month. See Gonna, go hang out with my brother and the polar bears in the Arctic for a little while.

Speaker 3:

We're gonna miss you on that one.

Speaker 1:

Bring back some pictures hopefully we will.

Speaker 3:

maybe we can do a podcast of that alone.

Speaker 1:

Good, do a whole debrief of my Arctic adventure. That would be kinda cool. Now the pressure's on. Now I gotta. Now the pressure's on to find a polar bear.

Speaker 2:

A polar bear effect.

Speaker 1:

You do have a zoo up there somewhere, I'm sure.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, but I know you won't be shooting those with your iPhone.

Speaker 1:

No, better not be.

Speaker 2:

Okay, everybody. Well, that's it for another week. That was the week will be our October 23rd edition.

Speaker 3:

Have a great week, folks.

Speaker 2:

We will be back to you next week.

Speaker 3:

Until next time, go burrows go, burrows go oh ow.

Speaker 1:

My Burbank Talks would like to thank all of my Burbanks advertisers for their continued support. Burbank Water and Power, kusamano Real Estate Group. Ume Credit Union. The Burbank Chamber of Commerce, gain Credit Union, providence, st Joseph Medical Center Community. Chevrolet. Media City Credit Union, ucla Health. Tequila's Cantina Grill, ups Store on Third Street and Hill Street Cafe.

Burbank Talks, St. Joseph, City Council
Goodbye and Congratulations, Devin Haranda
The Purpose of the Police Commission
City Attorney, Parking, Recognition, Graduation
City Manager Report and Bridge
Discussion on Various Burbank Topics
Cost and Benefits of Coin-Operated Parking
Discussion on Construction Impacts and Traditions
Observations on City Memorials
Polar Bear Finding and Advertising Support